heterophile antibody test


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heterophile antibody test

[′hed·ə·rə‚fīl ′an·ti‚bäd·ē ‚test]
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although heterophile antibody test is not sensitive, the positive result can reject the need for further investigation.
A validating cohort study compared peripheral blood samples m 181 patients aged >16 years with a clinical diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis confirmed by a positive heterophile antibody test with those from 181 similar patients with a negative test.
In the appropriate clinical situation, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends verifying the diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis with a CBC and heterophile antibody test. If the heterophile test result is negative, addition al testing such as EBV DNA tests may be necessary.
We appreciate Dr Tetrault's concern that the heterophile antibody test must have sufficient sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing infectious mononucleosis caused by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV).
To the Editor.--Tsaparas et al[1] published an interesting study describing a cost-effective algorithm for evaluating patients with suspected infectious mononucleosis (IM) and negative heterophile antibody tests. The study has 3 problems.
There were 2 a priori routes for entry into the study, and 4 patients entered via the alternate route with the heterophile antibody test being ordered by the laboratory physician.
Figure 3 outlines the apparent simplest and most cost effective model for triaging heterophile antibody tests. In designing this algorithm, an assumption was made that EBV represented the most significant viral infection.
Although the heterophile antibody test may occasionally be false positive in patients with autoimmune diseases, serum sickness, pregnancy, or HIV infection, false negatives are far more frequent (about 15% overall), particularly in children who are under 4 years of age (approximately 45%).
The diagnosis relies on atypical lymphocytes which resemble monocytes or on heterophile antibody tests which assess agglutination with sheep, guinea pig and horse red cells.