heterotroph


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Related to heterotroph: heterotroph hypothesis

heterotroph

(hĕt`ərətrōf'), living organism that obtains its energy from carbohydrates and other organic material. All animals and most bacteria and fungi are heterotrophic. In contrast, autotrophsautotroph
, in biology, an organism capable of synthesizing its own organic substances from inorganic compounds. Autotrophs produce their own sugars, lipids, and amino acids using carbon dioxide as a source of carbon, and ammonia or nitrates as a source of nitrogen.
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 are organisms that use inorganic substances as energy sources and carbon dioxide as a carbon source.
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heterotroph

[′hed·ə·rō‚träf]
(biology)
An organism that obtains nourishment from the ingestion and breakdown of organic matter.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results for coliform and heterotroph bacterial analysis in bottles and open containers were compared by using the Fisher exact test (Sigma Stat for Windows 2.03, SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA).
The study was performed on aerobic heterotrophs contained in test-tubes under the sterile conditions; and the impact of chemical additives was analysed doublechecking all samples.
A secondary objective was to determine whether the use of ionization with lower levels of chlorine would adequately control other bacteria, such as heterotrophs. This article reports the results of the bacteriological testing.
The plankton of oligotrophic oceans, for example, is often dominated by the biomass of heterotrophs, notably bacteria and colorless protozoans (Cho and Azam 1990), and so is the plankton of unproductive lakes (del Giorgio and Gasol 1995).
Throughout the gyre between 0-50 m depths, heterotrophs were up to 75-80% of all eukaryotic cells when measured directly by epifluorescence microscopy (Masquelier & Vaulot, 2008).
The dynamics of the estuarine environment and the ability to import and export substances create a mixture system that keeps a great association of physical, chemical and biological components, generating high biological productivity rates and elevated levels of autotroph and heterotroph biomass (Nixon, 1981).
Stable isotopes usually cannot determine exactly what a heterotroph has been consuming (because isotope compositions of sources may overlap), but they can be used to constrain what it has not been eating, providing insights into possible isotope ranges of food sources (Levin 2005, MacAvoy et al.
If I added heavy-carbon-labeled glucose to the seawater and I see a particular lipid with a heavy-carbon label, that tells me the lipid was made by a heterotroph. By doing this with glucose and dissolved carbon dioxide, both labeled with heavy carbon, I can distinguish whether each of the lipids I found was made by a heterotroph or an autotroph.
The heterotroph [[delta].sup.34]S values resulted from consumption of organisms utilizing a mixture of seawater sulfate and sulfate produced by oxidation of [H.sub.2]S (Aharon & Fu 2003).
TSR is a general definition for many important processes including respiration by live roots and associated mycorrhizae as well as by soil heterotroph, and chemical oxidation of plant detritus such as roots, leaves, woody inputs, root exudates, and humified organic matter.
To test the resistance of the experimental ecosystems to invasion, another measure of stability, 10 cells of Euplotes sp, a facultative heterotroph containing endosymbiotic algae, were introduced and population growth was measured after two weeks (10-15 generations of Euplotes).