heuristics


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heuristics

[hyu̇′ris·tiks]
(psychology)
The study of the mental processes involved in problem solving.
References in periodicals archive ?
The three selected construction heuristics are insertions heuristic (IH), savings heuristics (SH), and nearest-neighbor heuristic (NNH).
We begin with an overview of DARP literature with focus on construction heuristics and then formulate the DARP problem into a set of constraints.
In a sense, heuristics are the body's simple protection mechanism to keep the brain from consuming too much glucose at the expense of other parts.
In this investigation, we focus on analyzing the relation between instances and heuristics for constraint satisfaction problem (CSP), which is one of the most studied combinatorial problems in the literature.
Although some heuristics and strategies for convex shape are probably similar to nonconvex one, after all, they are not the same problem.
Nielsen's heuristics have been applied and adapted for the special requirements of serving diverse populations in public libraries (Aitta, Kaleva, & Kortelainen, 2008).
In general, the exponential time complexity of exact algorithms allows them to solve only very small problem instances; this motivates the search for fast heuristics and meta-heuristic techniques which can approximate low cost BDSTs on much larger problem sizes within reasonable time.
Discovery can be comprehended by heuristics of uncovering.
The development of rational thought: A taxonomy of heuristics and biases.
Our goals were to gain evidence that the design heuristics identify key strategies used by designers, and to compare the use of strategies by different types of designers.
There are many definitions of heuristics in computer science, psychology and operations research (for more discussion, see Katsikopoulos, 2011).
We call this cycle--(i) reliance on heuristics that reasonably approximate reality; (ii) the development of customs based on those heuristics; (iii) changes that disconnect those customs from reality; and (iv) failures resulting from continued reliance on those customs--the custom-to-failure cycle.