hexapla


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Related to hexapla: Septuagint

Hexapla

(hĕk`səplə) [Gr.,=sixfold], polyglot edition of the Hebrew Bible prepared by OrigenOrigen
, 185?–254?, Christian philosopher and scholar. His full name was Origines Adamantius, and he was born in Egypt, probably in Alexandria. When he was quite young, his father was martyred.
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 (c.185–c.255). It was mainly in six columns—a Hebrew text (probably the Masoretic), a Greek transliteration of it, and four Greek versions (those of Aquila, Symmachus, and Theodotion, and a revised version of the Septuagint). For certain sections of the Hebrew text, three further Greek versions were added. Some fragments survive. See Polyglot BiblePolyglot Bible
, Bible in which different texts, often in different languages, are laid out in parallel columns. Polyglot Bibles serve as tools for textual criticism. Origen's Hexapla was the most famous ancient example.
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hexapla

an edition of the Old Testament compiled by Origen, containing six versions of the text
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
See, e.g., Andrew Willet, Hexapla: that is, A Six-fold Commentarie upon the most Divine Epistle of the Holy Apostle S.
(3) John Francis Fenlon, "Hexapla," in The Catholic
The Hexapla, as the title suggests, was a book with six parallel columns: a Hebrew version of the Old Testament (the Jewish scriptures), a transliteration of the Hebrew into Greek characters, the Greek versions of Aquila, Symmachus, the Septuagint, and Theodotion, in that order.
Yudicky 2005: 136, in discussing the representations of the reduced vowels in the transcription of the Hexapla, deals with the imperative form [lambda]oo[mu], which he believes to be a reflection of lunum which means "fight." The regular Tiberian form is tham.
Grafton and Williams focus on two massive works: Origen's Hexapla and Eusebius's Chronology.
He argues that Eusebius follows Origen, who embraced the goals and methods of Greek philosophy as displayed in his Hexapla and his discussion about the authorship of Hebrews.
Texts like Origen's Hexapla and Methodius's Symposium, and even inscriptions like those of Abercius and Pectorius, as well as lesser known figures like John of Jerusalem or Severian of Gabala, find discussion in the Literary History, though go unmentioned in the Cambridge History.
This arrangement places Montale in English in a narrow yet ancient genre whose roots reach back to Origen's Hexapla, a third-century Bible with two Hebrew and four Greek translations laid out in adjacent columns.
Origen excelled at scripture and, for instance, created the wonderful Hexapla, a Bible with parallel columns of Hebrew and different Greek translations.
Though Jerome had the original manuscript, his chief work of Biblical scholarship, the Hexapla ("SixFold")--in which the Old Testament in Hebrew (which Origen learned for this purpose), the (Greek) Septuagint, and four other versions were arranged in parallel columns with critical editorial signs, 6000 pages long--is almost wholly lost.