hexapla

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Hexapla

(hĕk`səplə) [Gr.,=sixfold], polyglot edition of the Hebrew Bible prepared by OrigenOrigen
, 185?–254?, Christian philosopher and scholar. His full name was Origines Adamantius, and he was born in Egypt, probably in Alexandria. When he was quite young, his father was martyred.
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 (c.185–c.255). It was mainly in six columns—a Hebrew text (probably the Masoretic), a Greek transliteration of it, and four Greek versions (those of Aquila, Symmachus, and Theodotion, and a revised version of the Septuagint). For certain sections of the Hebrew text, three further Greek versions were added. Some fragments survive. See Polyglot BiblePolyglot Bible
, Bible in which different texts, often in different languages, are laid out in parallel columns. Polyglot Bibles serve as tools for textual criticism. Origen's Hexapla was the most famous ancient example.
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hexapla

an edition of the Old Testament compiled by Origen, containing six versions of the text
References in periodicals archive ?
Before J the Hebrew was not taken seriously, and it was "only in the Latin world that the implication of the Hexapla and the Hexaplaric LXX was fully understood" (p.
A first step was to support the hexaplaric recension of the LXX over against all others as the closest to the Hebrew.
In making these comments, I have focussed on some areas of disagreement between Hayward and myself, with an eye to future study of the text and to developments in the area of Hexaplaric research.
Veltri suggests that the rabbinic Aquila represents a vernacular oral interpretation used in the synagogue and representing rabbinic exegesis, rather than a fixed literary translation as with the Hexaplaric Aquila fragments.
A Paris manuscript, Coislinianus 193, contains 73 scolia on this biblical book, interspersed with a selection of hexaplaric textual variants.
Thus Stanley seems to neglect, in particular, the special position in Isaiah and the Hexaplaric character of B.
We know that Jerome revised certain books of the Old Testament on the basis of Origen's Hexaplaric LXX, specifically Psalms, Job, Chronicles, and the `Books of Solomon', but how many other books were revised in this fashion is not clear.
Nautin, according to whom Jerome knew very little Hebrew, and based his version iuxta Hebraeos on the translations of Aquila and Symmachus which he knew, not from the Hexapla itself, but from a Hexaplaric manuscript of the LXX which contained readings from those translators in the margin.
His bottom-line position was the support of the |Hebraized' Hexaplaric recension, which he himself published in Latin form.