heyday


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heyday

An earlier time period in which something was very popular. For example, "the CP/M operating system had its heyday in the 1980s." Pronounced "hay-day."
References in periodicals archive ?
Heyday is a skin-care destination that specializes in making facials a routine step in everyday life.
Here, we look back at some of the picture palaces that drew enormous audiences in their 1940s and 50s heyday - yet none of them still survive today.
In 2013, it was reported that there were 400 Bingo halls in the UK, which is half the number in the game's heyday.
Now, a fine new hardback book, The Heyday Of The Football Annual - Post-war to Premiership, relates the history of the genre in all its colourful glory.
There are many books about drag racing and cars on the market; but few take the heyday of their appearance and blends it with a modern visual contrast and discussion of where the cars are today.
HOLIDAYMAKERS are being invited to take a trip to the heyday of the great British seaside with a new summer exhibition on Tyneside.
This release includes the debut of Showdown Rye IPA, as well as a new season for Heyday White Ale, and the return of Oatmeal Yeti Imperial Stout.
The HeyDay app, not only creates a daily timeline based on photos found on the device that are added to a timeline, but also logs venues using the phone's GPS system and allows users to add personal notes and tag people to the photos.
Only last week Brummie rock legend Steve Gibbons was invited back to reopen the store at the venue he played at during its heyday.
US casual games publisher eGames (PINK:EGAM) said today it had closed the takeover of cross-platform social games maker Heyday Games in an all-stock deal whose value was not disclosed.
Alas I found the whole enterprise a crushing bore and Alan McGee's endless pontificating about how great it was during their heyday just made me want to flee.