hibernaculum

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Related to hibernacula: hibernaculum

hibernaculum

[‚hī·bər′nak·yə·ləm]
(biology)
A winter shelter for plants or dormant animals.
(botany)
A winter bud or other winter plant part.
(invertebrate zoology)
A winter resting bud produced by a few fresh-water bryozoans which grows into a new colony in the spring.
References in periodicals archive ?
Key words: activity, body condition, citizen science, habitat, hibernacula, migration, stable isotopes
Since the fungus is most destructive to large colonies in caves, bats that have adapted to wintering in tiny, "non-traditional" hibernacula may have a better shot at staying healthy, mating, and recovering their species.
In the summer of 2014 and winter of 2015, we collected 385 samples from hibernacula surfaces at 12 sites in 3 provinces and 1 municipality (Figure, panel A) and 215 samples from 9 species of bats at 10 sites (summer: Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, Rhinolophus pusillus, Myotis adversus, Myotis macrodactylus, Myotis pilosus, Myotis chinensis, Murina usseriensis; winter: R.
Perhaps this tolerance of other males resulted from the trial being run late in the season when juveniles were about to enter hibernacula (adults were no longer surface active).
We obtained information about sex age (juvenile or adult) and reproductive status (only for females: inactive pregnant or lactating) partly to determine roost use: hibernacula maternity roost or non- breeding male and/or female roosts.
Basking is particularly frequent in spring when snakes emerge from hibernacula (Gregory, 1982, 1984).
Methods traditionally employed to survey bat populations include visual counts of roosting bats, evening emergence counts, mark-recapture methods, mist netting, harp trapping, and hibernacula surveys (Kunz 2003).
three weeks) immediately following snowmelt, after which the larvae spin hibernacula and become dormant until the following spring (Kukal and Dawson, 1989; Morewood and Ring, 1998).
1996; Fogell, 2010), and their winter survival in hibernacula increases with greater saturation levels of substrates (Costanzo, 1986, 1989).
The land trust has been busy building dozens of turtle and snake nesting structures, as well as over-wintering habitats called hibernacula, and other habitat enhancements to replace the natural areas which have been lost through human changes to the landscape.
The burrows they hibernate in, called hibernacula, cut off most cues to the world above.
Methods on how to avoid unnecessary disturbance of bats during the hibernation period are important to bat researchers visiting bat hibernacula.