hibernate

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hibernate

A power-off mode that preserves the last state of the computer. Turning the computer on after hibernating eliminates booting the operating system and reloading all the applications and data.

When hibernate is activated, the contents of memory (RAM) are written to storage (hard disk, SSD) and the computer is turned off. When turned back on again, the previous memory state is read from storage, and all applications appear exactly as they did the moment hibernate was triggered.

Hibernate vs. Sleep Mode
Hibernate is power off, whereas sleep mode is power on with the screen and hard disks turned off. In sleep mode, the RAM chips are constantly refreshed in order to retain their content, and the CPU is placed into a low-power state. Although restoring from hibernate is faster than a cold start, coming out of sleep is immediate. Turning the computer back on from either mode eliminates having to reload all applications and data.

Hybrid Modes
Some laptop computers invoke both modes automatically. When put into sleep mode by the user, the computer may automatically go into hibernate mode when the battery reaches a low level. An alternative hybrid mode activates hibernate when the computer enters sleep mode, but the computer is not turned off. If the battery runs out while in sleep mode, the contents of memory have already been saved. See memory.
References in periodicals archive ?
In comparison, Morris & Hoodless (1992) found 1 x 1, 1 x 2 and 1 x 3 hibernating individuals whilst excavating radio-collared hibernating Glis in a different wood.
comm.) In British Columbia, bats have been reported hibernating in >60 caves or mines, but invariably only small numbers have been observed (DW Nagorsen, Mammalia Biological Consulting, pers.
The squirrels were divided into three groups: hibernating (n=3), aroused (n=3) and non- hibernating (n=3) housed individually in a room with an ambient temperature of 21oC with a 12 h light/12 h dark cycle, and were fed standard rodent diet and tap water ad libitum.
Besides loss of habitat, another concern on the horizon for Oregon bats is the dangerous white-nose syndrome, a deadly disease caused by a fungus that thrives in the same cold temperature range as hibernating bats, according to an ODFW press release.
A new study has provided crucial insight into the mysteries of the hibernating heart of a bear.
Their natural hibernating habitat is dead wood, so it if you have wooden rather than PVC window frames they may move in.
Astonishingly, hibernating bears lay down new bone, by producing a substance that inhibits cells that break down bone and promotes those that produce bone and cartilage.
But the swallows that nest there every summer, together with around 100 small tortoiseshell butterflies that will soon be hibernating for the winter, don't need a history lesson to know the old store is a safe place to be.
The data revealed that each time a hibernating bear takes a breath, its heart rate dramatically speeds up.
Scientists recently identified the fungus associated with the disease White-nose Syndrome (WNS) which has been afflicting hibernating bats in New York and across the northeast.