hiccup

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Related to hiccuping: hiccoughing

hiccup

or

hiccough,

involuntary spasmodic contraction of the diaphragm followed by a sharp intake of air, which is abruptly stopped by a sudden, involuntary closing of the glottis (opening between the vocal cords); the consequent blocking of air produces a repeated characteristic sharp sound, or hic. It is believed that hiccup is caused by stimulation of the nerve pathways or centers that control the muscles of respiration, particularly the diaphragm. In most instances hiccups are transient, although their course may sometimes be shortened by such measures as holding the breath, deep regular breathing, or rebreathing into a paper bag to increase the carbon dioxide content of the body. However, persistent hiccups may last for weeks, months, or even years. When hiccups are prolonged, therapy may include the administering of certain drugs, inhalation of carbon dioxide, and even interruption of the phrenic nerve either by injection of an anesthetic or by surgery.

hiccup

[′hik·əp]
(medicine)

hiccup

1. a spasm of the diaphragm producing a sudden breathing in followed by a closing of the glottis, resulting in a sharp sound
2. the state or condition of having such spasms
References in periodicals archive ?
But as I approached the window of joy, I felt a sudden rush of air into my lungs which caused my epiglottis to close - yes, I started hiccuping.
Jennifer Mee, who hiccuped close to 50 times each waking minute for more than five weeks from January 23, began hiccuping again after a nose bleed, said her mother Rachel Robidoux in St Petersburg, Florida.
Since hiccuping is associated with eating, it has been suggested that its physiological purpose is to shift food lodged in the esophagus.
A MAN who has been hiccuping for two years is devastated after finding there is probably no cure and he will have them for life.
Chris McKernan, 19, of Tunbridge Wells, Kent, has hiccupped an average of 1,500 times an hour - meaning he's awake around 16 hours a day, and hiccuping 24,000 times daily, the Mirror reported.
The three-week-old African monkey has been hiccuping after every milk feed since birth.