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Hickory,

city (1990 pop. 28,301), Burke and Catawba counties, W N.C., at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mts.; inc. 1870. It is a processing and trade center for an abundant agricultural region (grain, soybeans, poultry, hogs, cattle, dairying). Manufactures include furniture; textiles and tape; stone, plastic, and metal products; electric and electronic equipment; optical fibers; and consumer goods. Tourism is also important, and Hickory is the seat of Lenoir-Rhyne College. In the city are the Hickory Museum of Art and the Catawba Science Center. The Hickory Motor Speedway is nearby.

hickory,

any plant of the genus Carya of the family Juglandaceae (walnutwalnut,
common name for some members of the Juglandaceae, a family of chiefly deciduous, resinous trees characterized by large and aromatic compound leaves. Species of the walnut family are indigenous mostly to the north temperate zone, but also range from Central America along
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 family); deciduous nut-bearing trees native to E North America and south to Central America except for a few species found in SE Asia. The pecan (C. illinoinensis) is one of the most important nut trees of the United States. This tree, the tallest of the hickories, is native from S Illinois through the Mississippi valley to central Texas and Mexico. A rich food (containing 70% or more fat), the pecan is the most popular American nut after the peanut and is used as a table delicacy, in ice cream, and for confectionery, especially the traditionally Southern pecan pies and pralines. Cultivated varieties with unusually thin shells, called paper-shelled pecans, have been developed, but wild pecans are also gathered and sold in quantity. Other hickories having edible nuts that are marketed to a lesser extent include the shagbark hickory (C. ovata) of the E United States, the shellbark hickory (C. laciniosa), chiefly of the Midwest and South, and the mockernut, or white, hickory (C. alba or C. tomentosa) of the E United States. The hickory nut of commerce is usually that of the shagbark (the names shagbark and shellbark are often used interchangeably), which has a relatively thin shell. Native Americans made a food of ground hickory nuts. The abundant oil or fat of the nuts was a staple article in the diets of both Native Americans and early colonists. The pignut (C. glabra) has small nuts of variable quality, usually bitter, that have been used as mast for fattening hogs. Many hickories have been so exploited for their valuable wood that they are in danger of extinction. The wood of several species is extremely hard, heavy, strong, and elastic. It is a preferred wood for golf clubs, wheel spokes, and tool handles and wherever strength and resilience are required. Prairie schooners often carried hickory sticks on their westward treks to replace broken wagon parts and ox yokes. The wood, used also for furniture, is prone to decay in moisture. Shagbark hickory is the most valuable for timber. Hickory is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Juglandales, family Juglandaceae.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

hickory

A tough, hard, strong wood; has high shock resistance and high bending strength. See also: Douglas fir
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

hickory

[′hik·ə·rē]
(botany)
The common name for species of the genus Carya in the order Fagales; tall deciduous tree with pinnately compound leaves, solid pith, and terminal, scaly winter buds.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hickory

A tough, hard, strong wood of North America; has high shock resistance and high bending strength.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hickory

1. any juglandaceous tree of the chiefly North American genus Carya, having nuts with edible kernels and hard smooth shells
2. the hard tough wood of any of these trees
3. the nut of any of these trees
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Fifty yr from now, dispersal and establishment of hickory on this site may permit the hickories to take advantage of small openings in the canopy in the manner described by McCormick and Platt (1980).
Vietnamese and Chinese alike grow hickories as food crops and value their medicinal properties.
You could go into a grove of hickories and had to watch where you stepped or you'd fall in the nuts.
The true hickories grow in ranges from eastern Canada through much of the eastern United States all the way into southwestern Mexico.
And while the pecan hickories are the most famous for their nuts, shagbark hickory also yields edible nuts.
True hickories usually have a straight grain but it is sometimes wavy or irregular.
Unlike many other woods, true hickories' second-growth trees appear to exceed the virgin stands in many properties.
In the book "Encyclopedia of Trees," Hugh Johnson writes about the unique hickories. "It is not hard to characterize the hickories as a race.
Johnson says the most readily identifiable of all hickories is the shagbark hickory.
But fires discriminate among hardwoods, favoring oaks and cherries while discouraging maples and hickories. And many areas in the city's forests burn every year or two, a regimen that stunts the growth of any new trees and wounds the trunks of the giants until they rot at the base and topple over.
In the broad area of this former Norway maple kingdom, they've planted about 1,000 native saplings, although most are hard to see from the pathway, including red, white, and chestnut oaks, bitternut hickories, flowering dogwoods, and red and sugar maples.
Emmerich shows me around the future forest: a plastic greenhouse of oak seedlings and outdoor cribs of oaks, hickories, white pines, red cedars, sweetgums, and tuliptrees.