hierarchical

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Related to hierarchal: hierarchical structure

hierarchical

A structure made up of different levels like a company organization chart. The higher levels have control or precedence over the lower levels. Hierarchical structures are a one-to-many relationship; each item having one or more items below it. See hierarchical navigation and hierarchical addressing.

File Systems Are Hierarchical
The system for organizing files on a hard drive or SSD is structured as a hierarchy. The desktop is often placed at the top of the hierarchy, followed by folders and subfolders within the folders. See folder, Win Explorer and file system.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the second experiment, Galinsky and his co-authors examined the biological basis of hierarchal differentiation to determine whether individual differences play a role in the formation of naturally occurring hierarchies.
Fern leaf terminology is mostly a hierarchal system that describes a leaf from its base to its tip (Gifford and Foster, 1989; Andersen and Ollgaard, 1996) except for the terms penultimate and antepenultimate which are used to describe the second and third segment basiscopically from the ultimate segment, respectfully.
Whereas the Royal Navy and the Imperial Japanese Navy were hierarchal and faction ridden, the U.
This hierarchal racialization by administrators in the public school system is one example of how South Asian Americans are viewed by the mainstream in Silicon Valley as the model minority.
This organizational chart represents a company structure that empowers employees in a way that could never be illustrated by the hierarchal chart on the right.
Among the new criteria proposed by the railway company as an alternative to military service is having worked at an institution with a clear hierarchal structure and having worked in shifts for a year and a half continuously.
These research articles show the distinction between stochastic and hierarchal models of tumor development, exploring such advances as the identification of cancer stem cell populations through the evaluation of molecular markers.
In the 1950s in the United States, roles of and relationships between family members were often hierarchal in a clearly delineated "traditional" model.
Social media can break down hierarchal boundaries by making C-suite executives more easily accessible to others in the organization.
Among the large primates and particularly the apes, we see the hierarchal structures and behavior patterns used to keep the troupes functional and relatively free of conflict.
Like scientists who look through microscopes to view the smallest structures of living creatures and then record them in fine detail, these poets move away from emblematic, allegorical representations of nature to represent the natural world as they observe it, "subordinat[ing] figurative meaning to observation, question[ing] or discard[ing] oppressive hierarchal assumptions, and express[ing] specific and affinitive perception of actual animals, plants, elements, and processes" (5).
Since paternalism is necessarily a hierarchal system, both the Cajun's intermediate situation between whites and blacks and his children with both white and black women complicate the social structure, but Costello explains that "performances of racial ambiguity do not inherently generate any kind of positive social change" (115).