hierarchy

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hierarchy:

see ministryministry,
in religion, term used to designate the clergy of Protestant churches, particularly those who repudiate the claims of apostolic succession. The ceremony by which the candidate receives the office of a minister is called ordination.
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 and orders, holyorders, holy
[Lat. ordo,=rank], in Christianity, the traditional degrees of the clergy, conferred by the Sacrament of Holy Order. The episcopacy, priesthood or presbyterate, and diaconate were in general use in Christian churches in the 2d cent.
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.

Hierarchy

An arrangement or system of ranking one above the other or arranged in a graded series or sequence such as size (large to small), shape (similar or dissimilar), and placement (emphasis or location).

Hierarchy

 

the ordering of parts or elements of a whole from the highest to the lowest.

The term “hierarchy” was introduced not earlier than the second half of the fifth century by Pseudo-Dionysius in his treatises The Celestial Hierarchy and The Ecclesiastical Hierarchy. Until the 19th century, it was used to describe the organization of the Christian church. The development of the conception of hierarchy in science began in the second half of the 19th century. In the social sciences, the conception of hierarchy was originally used to describe class-estate divisions in an antagonistic society (for example, feudal hierarchy) and to characterize the structure of authority, especially of bureaucracy. In contemporary bourgeois sociology, numerous research studies have been devoted to the hierarchy of prestige, the hierarchy of wealth, and the hierarchy of power and control as an expression of social stratification and of social inequality.

With the appearance of the general systems theory in the 20th century, the conception of hierarchy was applied to describe any system objects. Hierarchically organized forms exist in all spheres of objective reality: inorganic, biological, and social. In Marxist philosophy, the idea of the hierarchy of qualitatively irreducible structural levels of matter has been developed. In general organizational theory, hierarchy is seen as the principle of control that secures the effective functioning of the organization. The hierarchy of levels (tiers) of a language is distinguished in linguistics. In graph theory the hierarchically constructed graph (the so-called tree) is used.

L. A. SEDOV

hierarchy

1. Religion a body of persons in holy orders organized into graded ranks
2. Taxonomy a series of ordered groupings within a system, such as the arrangement of plants and animals into classes, orders, families, etc.
3. Linguistics Maths a formal structure, usually represented by a diagram of connected nodes, with a single uppermost element
4. government by an organized priesthood

hierarchy

An organisation with few things, or one thing, at the top and with several things below each other thing. An inverted tree structure. Examples in computing include a directory hierarchy where each directory may contain files or other directories; a hierarchical network (see hierarchical routing), a class hierarchy in object-oriented programming.

hierarchy

A structure that has a predetermined ordering from high to low. For example, all files and folders on the hard disk are organized in a hierarchy (see Win Folder organization).
References in periodicals archive ?
Since in the current study, examining the relationship of some thinking styles including monarchic, hierarchic, oligarchic and anarchic with other variables were not predicted, hence, questions related to these thinking styles were omitted.
But when Chinese power rose, Han emperor Wu used force to eradicate the Xiongnu threat and established a hierarchic order in East Asia (di Cosmo 2002).
At least 17 major formal secotral laws are there (DID 2003), that form a complex rule making processes and hierarchic inter-organizational network for the IRBM in LRB.
With chapter 4 providing a theological interlude highlighting the whole hierarchic world order (from which the economic analysis itself now prescinds), chapter 5 outlines the breakthrough to economic science itself.
In particular, it is advanced here that the relations between Southeast Asian countries and the United States in the post-9/11 era signify the intimate linkages between hegemonic and hierarchic rule.
A new hierarchic approach to the measurement of dementia.
In addition, of course, centralised decision-making doesn't always exist: in warfare, where hierarchic decision-making might be expected to be commonplace, taking out the command posts is a normal tactic.
However, existing financial information systems concentrate on providing information reflecting hierarchic connections between indicators.
In their opinion we must look for elements of symbiosis rather than applying a strict hierarchic model when regarding the position of Srivijaya.
In such circumstances, it's difficult for the top leaders of hierarchic systems to do a good job.
What makes any hierarchic structures weak is that they collapse with liquidation of the key figure.
Somewhere between the monopolistic, hierarchic and centralized mass media outlets of the 20th century and the atomistic, anarchic and decentralized nature of citizen production and distribution lies the sweet spot, a place between institution and amateur, between left and right brain.