hierarchy

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hierarchy:

see ministryministry,
in religion, term used to designate the clergy of Protestant churches, particularly those who repudiate the claims of apostolic succession. The ceremony by which the candidate receives the office of a minister is called ordination.
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 and orders, holyorders, holy
[Lat. ordo,=rank], in Christianity, the traditional degrees of the clergy, conferred by the Sacrament of Holy Order. The episcopacy, priesthood or presbyterate, and diaconate were in general use in Christian churches in the 2d cent.
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Hierarchy

An arrangement or system of ranking one above the other or arranged in a graded series or sequence such as size (large to small), shape (similar or dissimilar), and placement (emphasis or location).

Hierarchy

 

the ordering of parts or elements of a whole from the highest to the lowest.

The term “hierarchy” was introduced not earlier than the second half of the fifth century by Pseudo-Dionysius in his treatises The Celestial Hierarchy and The Ecclesiastical Hierarchy. Until the 19th century, it was used to describe the organization of the Christian church. The development of the conception of hierarchy in science began in the second half of the 19th century. In the social sciences, the conception of hierarchy was originally used to describe class-estate divisions in an antagonistic society (for example, feudal hierarchy) and to characterize the structure of authority, especially of bureaucracy. In contemporary bourgeois sociology, numerous research studies have been devoted to the hierarchy of prestige, the hierarchy of wealth, and the hierarchy of power and control as an expression of social stratification and of social inequality.

With the appearance of the general systems theory in the 20th century, the conception of hierarchy was applied to describe any system objects. Hierarchically organized forms exist in all spheres of objective reality: inorganic, biological, and social. In Marxist philosophy, the idea of the hierarchy of qualitatively irreducible structural levels of matter has been developed. In general organizational theory, hierarchy is seen as the principle of control that secures the effective functioning of the organization. The hierarchy of levels (tiers) of a language is distinguished in linguistics. In graph theory the hierarchically constructed graph (the so-called tree) is used.

L. A. SEDOV

hierarchy

1. Religion a body of persons in holy orders organized into graded ranks
2. Taxonomy a series of ordered groupings within a system, such as the arrangement of plants and animals into classes, orders, families, etc.
3. Linguistics Maths a formal structure, usually represented by a diagram of connected nodes, with a single uppermost element
4. government by an organized priesthood

hierarchy

An organisation with few things, or one thing, at the top and with several things below each other thing. An inverted tree structure. Examples in computing include a directory hierarchy where each directory may contain files or other directories; a hierarchical network (see hierarchical routing), a class hierarchy in object-oriented programming.

hierarchy

A structure that has a predetermined ordering from high to low. For example, all files and folders on the hard disk are organized in a hierarchy (see Win Folder organization).
References in periodicals archive ?
The relevant intrinsic properties are represented in scales which establish priorities and which have been given the name of priority hierarchies. These hierarchies have been proposed as typologically relevant and present a diversity of properties which highlight the pluridimensional approach adopted by the functional theoretical model in the study of Subject assignment.
Just as hierarchies can be used to "see the future," they can also be used to compare current results to "what would have been." Consider the previous example of a branch consolidation.
The second major problem with this book derives from the first: Pooler's focus on hierarchies of size precludes any serious attention being given to conceptual hierarchies.
Gunther and Folke (1993) label ecological hierarchies of this sort, holarchies, that is consisting of a set of fully nested holons.
Recently, seeking new integrable systems including soliton hierarchies and integrable couplings forms a pretty important and interesting area of research in mathematical physics.
Instead, Shakespeare maintains traditional social hierarchies while he molds the fluid spaces of the stage to the English audience's expectations of an imagined Italian city represented according to their own theatrical standards.
The company says its software creates or imports topic hierarchies automatically, eliminating manual document tagging or hierarchy development and reducing time required to develop detailed hierarchies by up to 97%.
Dante's classification of angels followed Dionysius, who divides them into three hierarchies, each containing three orders, i.e., the Seraphim, Cherubim and Thrones (first hierarchy); then, the Dominations (Dominions), Virtues and Powers (second hierarchy); and finally, the Princedoms, Archangels and Angels (third hierarchy).
In particular, Salter was fascinated by the minka farmsteads, in which buildings of a variety of scales, forms and materials - always related to their function were informally clustered around intimate but quite complex hierarchies of external spaces (AR June 1993).
Thus, as socialists and anarchists attacked sociopolitical hierarchies they also launched a frontal assault on the cultural master narrative when they torched the churches and destroyed religious icons a the outbreak of the Civil War.
Likewise, in spite of the claims made above, it seems incredible to argue that being systematically excluded from the pinnacles of authority and power in the church's sacramental, educational, administrative, financial, and juridical hierarchies is neither a disenfranchisement nor a limit to women's potential in the church.
The exhibit on page 34 compares the proposed and existing hierarchies.