hierarchy

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hierarchy:

see ministryministry,
in religion, term used to designate the clergy of Protestant churches, particularly those who repudiate the claims of apostolic succession. The ceremony by which the candidate receives the office of a minister is called ordination.
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 and orders, holyorders, holy
[Lat. ordo,=rank], in Christianity, the traditional degrees of the clergy, conferred by the Sacrament of Holy Order. The episcopacy, priesthood or presbyterate, and diaconate were in general use in Christian churches in the 2d cent.
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Hierarchy

An arrangement or system of ranking one above the other or arranged in a graded series or sequence such as size (large to small), shape (similar or dissimilar), and placement (emphasis or location).

Hierarchy

 

the ordering of parts or elements of a whole from the highest to the lowest.

The term “hierarchy” was introduced not earlier than the second half of the fifth century by Pseudo-Dionysius in his treatises The Celestial Hierarchy and The Ecclesiastical Hierarchy. Until the 19th century, it was used to describe the organization of the Christian church. The development of the conception of hierarchy in science began in the second half of the 19th century. In the social sciences, the conception of hierarchy was originally used to describe class-estate divisions in an antagonistic society (for example, feudal hierarchy) and to characterize the structure of authority, especially of bureaucracy. In contemporary bourgeois sociology, numerous research studies have been devoted to the hierarchy of prestige, the hierarchy of wealth, and the hierarchy of power and control as an expression of social stratification and of social inequality.

With the appearance of the general systems theory in the 20th century, the conception of hierarchy was applied to describe any system objects. Hierarchically organized forms exist in all spheres of objective reality: inorganic, biological, and social. In Marxist philosophy, the idea of the hierarchy of qualitatively irreducible structural levels of matter has been developed. In general organizational theory, hierarchy is seen as the principle of control that secures the effective functioning of the organization. The hierarchy of levels (tiers) of a language is distinguished in linguistics. In graph theory the hierarchically constructed graph (the so-called tree) is used.

L. A. SEDOV

hierarchy

1. Religion a body of persons in holy orders organized into graded ranks
2. Taxonomy a series of ordered groupings within a system, such as the arrangement of plants and animals into classes, orders, families, etc.
3. Linguistics Maths a formal structure, usually represented by a diagram of connected nodes, with a single uppermost element
4. government by an organized priesthood

hierarchy

An organisation with few things, or one thing, at the top and with several things below each other thing. An inverted tree structure. Examples in computing include a directory hierarchy where each directory may contain files or other directories; a hierarchical network (see hierarchical routing), a class hierarchy in object-oriented programming.

hierarchy

A structure that has a predetermined ordering from high to low. For example, all files and folders on the hard disk are organized in a hierarchy (see Win Folder organization).
References in periodicals archive ?
Viewing decision making as equivalent to managing, as Simon put it, the subgroup M1 of the seven hierarchizations of the corporation decision levels would be conveniently represented by Beer's VSM (M1.
However, it is fitting to conclude that the questioning of racialized workers' knowledge by co-workers also was associated with systems of social classification based on racial differences and hierarchization.
To my view, considering the clearly gendered canvas of Pre-Raphaelitism, any text discussing the period must mandatorily address issues of essentialist female representation and objectification in the perpetuation of gender hierarchization (Pollock [1988] 2008, 13).
Taste Differentiation and Hierarchization within Popular Culture: The Case of Salsa Music.
However, in order to be able to capitalize on this historical capital, the Swiss state adapts the argument of multilingualism to the markets it addresses, which leads to a hierarchization of the forms of <<diversity>> in Switzerland.
Certeau's words help express our aim in distinguishing between tactical and strategic ecumenism: "How is it possible to foil here and now the social hierarchization which organizes scientific work on popular cultures and repeats itself in that work?
ABSTRACT | This paper discusses the theoretical and political ascent of the spatial dimension and its application to the current hierarchization of territorial referencing.
Too much closeness and hierarchization can produce a myopic perception of the field (Literatura Electronica Hispanica) and make certain unclassifiable works unreachable.
The imbalance and hierarchization of male and female sexuality is a secondary effect of commodifying child-production.
As the declared intention of The Equality of the Human Races is the deconstruction of the concept of race and of the hierarchization of races, Firmin necessarily uses the term in its primary sense of a category in a species, especially in the human species, the sense given to it both in the vernacular and by biologists and early anthropologists.
Thus, the relationship between science and racial categorization cum hierarchization should be conceptualized similar to the traffic between original and copy, in which the supposedly secondary component necessitates the positing, and therefore creation, of an original.
For these two main players and witnesses to the recent history of French ethnological heritage, France's ratification of the Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage is "a decision that breaks with two centuries of state hierarchization of cultural assets.