high-density lipoprotein


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Related to high-density lipoprotein: LDL

high-density lipoprotein

[¦hī ‚den·səd·ē ‚lī·pō′prō‚tēn]
(biochemistry)
A lipoprotein containing more proteins than lipids that transports excess cholesterol from tissues to the liver for excretion. Abbreviated HDL.
References in periodicals archive ?
High-density lipoprotein cholesterol and particle concentrations, carotid atherosclerosis, and coronary events: MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis).
Concurring with our conclusion that, added to fasting triglyceride concentrations, elevated CRF was proposed to mark high-density lipoprotein (HDL) dysfunction in cardiometabolic diseases among men but not in women (in whom elevated complement C3 was identified as independent marker), the author pointed out that, in the long-term treatment of schizophrenic patients with clozapine, a drug that consistently raises CRF levels, women respond with about half as great a rise in CRF as men.
The study found that ProAlgaZyme increases good cholesterol or high-density lipoprotein (HDL).
researchers on Thursday found that a vitamin that raises people's High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol did not prevent heart attacks.
An unadjusted analysis of cancer incidence rates showed that every 10-mg/dL increment in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) was linked with a 24% relative reduction in new-onset cancers.
The study showed no effect on high-density lipoprotein, the good cholesterol.
Dietary cholesterol from eggs increases the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in humans: a meta-analysis.
5 million insurance applicants, the study found that the ability to identify increased mortality risk in young applicants with urine markers, such as glucose and protein, exceeded the ability to identify mortality risk with blood markers, such as cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein and the liver enzyme GGT.
After drinking three glasses of Tropicana Pure Premium Original orange juice each day, high-density lipoprotein (or "good") cholesterol went up 21 percent, something usually difficult to achieve without drugs.
Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), referred to as `bad' cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), referred to as `good' cholesterol.
Levels of beneficial high-density lipoprotein remained the same and sometimes increased.

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