high

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high

1. Music (of sound) acute in pitch; having a high frequency
2. Geography (of latitudes) situated relatively far north or south from the equator
3. Informal being in a state of altered consciousness, characterized esp by euphoria and often induced by the use of alcohol, narcotics, etc.
4. (of a gear) providing a relatively great forward speed for a given engine speed
5. of or relating to the High Church
6. Cards
a. having a relatively great value in a suit
b. able to win a trick
7. Informal a state of altered consciousness, often induced by alcohol, narcotics, etc.
8. another word for anticyclone
9. short for high school
10. (esp in Oxford) the High Street
11. Electronics the voltage level in a logic circuit corresponding to logical one

What does it mean when you dream about a high place?

Dreaming about being elevated can reflect, on the one hand, a sense of broad scope, of standing above and observing other things. On the other hand, it can indicate a sense of detachment, of not really being involved. Dreaming about seeing something elevated can indicate being impressed or being challenged.

high

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(meteorology)
An area of high pressure, referring to a maximum of atmospheric pressure in two dimensions (closed isobars) in the synoptic surface chart, or a maximum of height (closed contours) in the constant-pressure chart; since a high is, on the synoptic chart, always associated with anticyclonic circulation, the term is used interchangeably with anticyclone.

high

high
i. A height between 25,000 and 50,000 ft (7.5–15 km).
ii. An area of high barometric pressure with its attendant system of anticyclonic winds. They circulate clock-wise in the Northern Hemisphere and anticlock-wise in the Southern Hemisphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nakaima complained that the Japanese government had tried to pressure Okinawa to accept the plan ''abruptly and high-handedly.
Shouldn't I be berating this shallow, idle thing with Malvolian contempt, backhanding it high-handedly from some mordant critical perch?
Each of Atwood's lectures / essays straddles two or three putative opposites, then provokes and insists upon synthesis: "Apollo versus Mammon" crosses writers and money; "Temptation" moves from Prospero to Oz to the devil; "Duplicity" high-handedly washes "the Jekyll hand" against "the Hyde hand"; and the luminous chapter entitled "Communion" examines Book, Writer, and Reader as an essential--and quite possibly blessed--trinity.