hill


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Related to hill: William Hill

hill

1. a conspicuous and often rounded natural elevation of the earth's surface, less high or craggy than a mountain
2. over the hill Military slang absent without leave or deserting

Hill

1. Archibald Vivian. 1886--1977, British biochemist, noted for his research into heat loss in muscle contraction: shared the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine (1922)
2. Damon Graham Devereux, son of Graham Hill. born 1960, British motor-racing driver; Formula One world champion (1996)
3. David Octavius 1802--70, Scottish painter and portrait photographer, noted esp for his collaboration with the chemist Robert Adamson (1821-- 48)
4. Geoffrey (William). born 1932, British poet: his books include King Log (1968), Mercian Hymns (1971), The Mystery of the Charity of Charles Péguy (1983), and The Orchards of Syon (2002)
5. Graham. 1929--75, British motor-racing driver: world champion (1962, 1968)
6. Octavia. 1838--1912, British housing reformer; a founder of the National Trust
7. Sir Rowland. 1795--1879, British originator of the penny postage
8. Susan (Elizabeth). born 1942, British novelist and writer of short stories: her books include I'm the King of the Castle (1970) The Woman in Black (1983), and Felix Derby (2002)

What does it mean when you dream about a hill?

To climb and climb is to struggle and not succeed, whereas to reach the top of the hill is to have succeeded.

hill

[hil]
(geography)
A land surface feature characterized by strong relief; it is a prominence smaller than a mountain.
References in classic literature ?
As quick as lightning the man's head shot forward and his neck stretched out until the top of the head, where it was flat, struck the Scarecrow in the middle and sent him tumbling, over and over, down the hill. Almost as quickly as it came the head went back to the body, and the man laughed harshly as he said, "It isn't as easy as you think!"
"I'm afraid," she said, "the song is as dangerous as the hill. Of course it has more meanings than one?"
EYNSFORD HILL [taking up her daughter's cue] But why?
SO that at the bottom of the hill when they came to the stile, there was nothing left to carry except Lucie's one little bundle.
A vast number of the populace ascended the citadel hill early in the morning, to get out of the way of the general destruction, and many of the infatuated closed up their shops and retired from all earthly business.
A sign over the door denoted it to be the White Mountain Post Office -- an establishment which distributes letters and newspapers to perhaps a score of persons, comprising the population of two or three townships among the hills. The broad and weighty antlers of a deer, 'a stag of ten,' were fastened at the corner of the house; a fox's bushy tail was nailed beneath them; and a huge black paw lay on the ground, newly severed and still bleeding the trophy of a bear hunt.
Those of you who did so with their eyes open have been aware, soon after leaving the Didcot station, of a fine range of chalk hills running parallel with the railway on the left-hand side as you go down, and distant some two or three miles, more or less, from the line.
At first I regarded little but the road before me, and then abruptly my attention was arrested by something that was moving rapidly down the opposite slope of Maybury Hill. At first I took it for the wet roof of a house, but one flash following another showed it to be in swift rolling movement.
That red ran high up the hill of their refuge, damming back the little river, which had begun to spread into a brick-coloured lake.
The last burst carried the mail to the summit of the hill. The horses stopped to breathe again, and the guard got down to skid the wheel for the descent, and open the coach-door to let the passengers in.
It happened that just as he walked forward, Dinah had paused and turned round to look back at the village--who does not pause and look back in mounting a hill? Adam was glad, for, with the fine instinct of a lover, he felt that it would be best for her to hear his voice before she saw him.
Hunt and his party were now on the skirts of the Black Hills, or Black Mountains, as they are sometimes called; an extensive chain, lying about a hundred miles east of the Rocky Mountains, and stretching in a northeast direction from the south fork of the Nebraska, or Platte River, to the great north bend of the Missouri.