hip

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Related to hip dislocation: anterior hip dislocation

hip,

in human anatomy, the joint separating the thigh bone from the pelvis, and the surrounding flesh. The adult hipbone consolidates three bones separate in youth: the ilium, ischium, and pubis. The two prominences commonly called the hipbones are the crests of the ilia. The bones of the buttocks that support the seated body are projections of the ischia. At the body midline, fibrous tissue bands the two pubis bones, thus stabilizing the hips and preventing them from spreading or buckling. With maturity, the ilium, ischium, and pubis meet and grow together at a Y-shaped junction, the site of the acetabulum, a deep cavity that receives the rounded head of the thighbone, or femur. The resulting ball-and-socket joint allows great latitude of thigh movement. If arthritis affects the joint to such degree that medication and other therapies cannot sufficiently reduce pain and increase mobility, the hip may be replaced surgically, using a metal ball and stem implanted in the top of the thigh bone and an artificial socket secured in the pelvis. See also pelvispelvis,
bony, basin-shaped structure that supports the organs of the lower abdomen. It receives the weight of the upper body and distributes it to the legs; it also forms the base for numerous muscle attachments.
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; legleg,
one of the paired limbs of an animal used for support of the body and for locomotion. Properly, the human leg is that portion of the extremity between the foot and the thigh. This section of the human leg contains two long bones, the tibia and the fibula.
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Hip

The external angle at the junction of two sloping roofs or sides of a roof: the rafter at the angle where two sloping roofs or sides of a roof meet.

hip

[hip]
(anatomy)
The region of the junction of thigh and trunk.
The hip joint, formed by articulation of the femur and hipbone.
(building construction)
The external angle formed by the junction of two sloping roofs or the sides of a roof.
A rafter that is positioned at the junction of two sloping roofs or the sides of a roof.
(civil engineering)

HIP

[hip or ¦āch¦ī′pē]
(engineering)

hip

hips, 1 (flush panel type)
1. The external angle at the junction of two sloping roofs or sides of a roof.
2. The rafter at the angle where two sloping roofs or sides of roofs meet.
3. The joint of a bridge truss where the top chord meets the inclined end post.

hip

1
1. either side of the body below the waist and above the thigh, overlying the lateral part of the pelvis and its articulation with the thighbones
2. another name for pelvis
3. short for hip joint
4. the angle formed where two sloping sides of a roof meet or where a sloping side meets a sloping end

hip

2
the berry-like brightly coloured fruit of a rose plant: a swollen receptacle, rich in vitamin C, containing several small hairy achenes
References in periodicals archive ?
Operative versus nonoperative management of Pipkin type-II fractures associated with posterior hip dislocation.
Five (12%) respondents of this survey stated that they have treated patients for hip dislocation after EUA and a determination that the hip was stable.
Apart from the hip dislocation, Stephen also suffers from a chronic skin disease and has eczema along the skin folds of the joints, which need to be constantly treated with topical application of creams and lotions.
Simultaneous asymmetric bilateral hip dislocation with unilateral fracture of femur-peculiar mode of trauma in a case.
Open hip dislocation remains a rare occurrence due to the bulky muscle envelope surrounding the deeply situated hip joint.
The AAOS is quick to acknowledge the gray area on this topic: Hip resurfacing may be easier to revise, may decrease risk of hip dislocation, and generally result in a more normal walking pattern and greater range of hip motion.
Metal-on-metal implants are a lower wear alternative to metal-on-polymer devices, and allow for larger femoral heads, which can reduce the risk of hip dislocation.
Children with progeria look far older than their years, and suffer growth failure, loss of body fat and hair, aged-looking skin, stiff joints and hip dislocation.
Contrary to previous suggestions that LTT was unlikely in the absence of hip dislocation, it has been found to occur in up to three-quarters of cases without associated dislocation.
Positions that place excessive stress on the hip can also lead to hip dislocation.
of body fat, loss of hair, ageing of the skin, stiffness in the joints, hip dislocation, cardiac problems and stroke
There was no history of bony fractures, hip dislocation or mental retardation.