hip

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Related to hip dislocation: anterior hip dislocation

hip,

in human anatomy, the joint separating the thigh bone from the pelvis, and the surrounding flesh. The adult hipbone consolidates three bones separate in youth: the ilium, ischium, and pubis. The two prominences commonly called the hipbones are the crests of the ilia. The bones of the buttocks that support the seated body are projections of the ischia. At the body midline, fibrous tissue bands the two pubis bones, thus stabilizing the hips and preventing them from spreading or buckling. With maturity, the ilium, ischium, and pubis meet and grow together at a Y-shaped junction, the site of the acetabulum, a deep cavity that receives the rounded head of the thighbone, or femur. The resulting ball-and-socket joint allows great latitude of thigh movement. If arthritis affects the joint to such degree that medication and other therapies cannot sufficiently reduce pain and increase mobility, the hip may be replaced surgically, using a metal ball and stem implanted in the top of the thigh bone and an artificial socket secured in the pelvis. See also pelvispelvis,
bony, basin-shaped structure that supports the organs of the lower abdomen. It receives the weight of the upper body and distributes it to the legs; it also forms the base for numerous muscle attachments.
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; legleg,
one of the paired limbs of an animal used for support of the body and for locomotion. Properly, the human leg is that portion of the extremity between the foot and the thigh. This section of the human leg contains two long bones, the tibia and the fibula.
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Hip

The external angle at the junction of two sloping roofs or sides of a roof: the rafter at the angle where two sloping roofs or sides of a roof meet.

hip

[hip]
(anatomy)
The region of the junction of thigh and trunk.
The hip joint, formed by articulation of the femur and hipbone.
(building construction)
The external angle formed by the junction of two sloping roofs or the sides of a roof.
A rafter that is positioned at the junction of two sloping roofs or the sides of a roof.
(civil engineering)

HIP

[hip or ¦āch¦ī′pē]
(engineering)

hip

hips, 1 (flush panel type)
1. The external angle at the junction of two sloping roofs or sides of a roof.
2. The rafter at the angle where two sloping roofs or sides of roofs meet.
3. The joint of a bridge truss where the top chord meets the inclined end post.

hip

1
1. either side of the body below the waist and above the thigh, overlying the lateral part of the pelvis and its articulation with the thighbones
2. another name for pelvis
3. short for hip joint
4. the angle formed where two sloping sides of a roof meet or where a sloping side meets a sloping end

hip

2
the berry-like brightly coloured fruit of a rose plant: a swollen receptacle, rich in vitamin C, containing several small hairy achenes
References in periodicals archive ?
(14) identified 60 failed hip arthroscopies from over 1,700 surgeries, and of the 37 that underwent a revision hip preservation procedure, 90% of those treated with revision arthroscopy needed an additional femoroplasty, while 100% treated with open hip dislocation required further femoroplasty.
Caption: Figure 2: Pelvis anteroposterior radiograph showing the neglected hip dislocation of both hips.
Untreated traumatic hip dislocation which was thought as congenital hip dislocation
The hip is in flexion, adduction and internal rotation in posterior hip dislocation. [5] The involved limb appears shorter than the contralateral limb and the femoral head can be palpated posteriorly in posterior type of hip dislocation.
Although no patient had a history or current radiographic evidence for DDH or hip dislocation, following exposure of the acetabulum during surgery, the labrum was found to penetrate into the joint overlying the acetabular rim.
Bilateral coxa valga deformity with bizarre greater trochanters and shallow acetabulum with bilateral hip dislocation were seen in our patient.
Errors during management of labour can result in cerebral palsy, Erbs Palsy, hip dislocation and, tragically, sometimes the death of the baby.
The differential includes strain of gluteal, hamstring, adductor and hip external rotator muscles, sacroiliac or hip joint disease, bony fractures/ stress fractures, avulsion injuries, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, labral injuries, hip dislocation, lumbar radiculopathies, or nerve entrapment.
In a statement, the Irish Rugby Football Union said: "Investigations at University Hospital Wales con-firmed Tommy suffered a hip dislocation in the game against Wales.
Bilaterally developed false acetabulum causing increased degenerative changes, elongated capsules covering the femoral heads, and lumbar spine disc problems associated with the above mentioned complains, as well as the functional disabilities evolved at the age of 55 in such a male patient signifies the thorough natural history of a typical developmental dysplastic hip dislocation. (8,9) Similar cases are reported as isolated clinical problem presentation.
Orthopaedic problems for each neurological level Level % Deformity Thoracic (paraplegic) 23 Scoliosis Kyphosis Equinus Mid-lumbar (L3,4) 30 Hip dislocation Internal and external tibial torsion Clubfoot Congenital vertical talus Ankle and hindfoot valgus Low lumbar/calcaneus (L5) 17 Calcaneus Ankle valgus Hindfoot valgus Sacral/'normal' (S1) 30 Cavovarus foot
In May 2013, Stephen was diagnosed with a left hip dislocation. According to a report from the boys' pediatric orthopedic surgeon, Dr Marc Sinclair, from the Children's Medical Centre, though initial diagnosis did not suggest any long-lasting damage, the recent X-rays show a complete dislocation of his left hip bone.