sclerosis

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Related to Hippocampal sclerosis: temporal lobe epilepsy

sclerosis

1. Pathol a hardening or thickening of organs, tissues, or vessels from chronic inflammation, abnormal growth of fibrous tissue, or degeneration of the myelin sheath of nerve fibres, or (esp on the inner walls of arteries) deposition of fatty plaques
2. the hardening of a plant cell wall or tissue by the deposition of lignin

Sclerosis

 

the hardening of an organ or tissue in humans and animals caused by connective-tissue overgrowth. Functionally valuable elements of the parenchyma of a sclerosed organ are destroyed and replaced by mature and sometimes coarse-fibered connective tissue, which often contains deposits of amyloid, hyalin, and lime. New connective tissue is usually formed by the reproduction of fibroblasts (connective-tissue cells) and by the intensified formation of collagen molecules by the fibroblasts.

In cases of sclerosis, parenchymal elements may be destroyed by inflammatory processes that are usually chronic in nature, including tuberculosis, rheumatic fever, and syphilis, and by circulatory disturbances, including passive congestion. Parenchymal elements may also be destroyed by involutional changes, for example, the postpartum sclerosis of the corpus lutea, and by changes associated with age and by metabolic disturbances. Sclerosis may be focal or diffuse. The proliferated connective tissue may become corrugated, resulting in the deformation of the organ, or cirrhosis. During cirrhosis, the hardening and reduction of an organ are accompanied by surface changes, including alternating outpouchings and invaginations, such as in a granular kidney or nodular liver.

sclerosis

[sklə′rō·səs]
(pathology)
Hardening of a tissue, especially by proliferation of fibrous connective tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lack of Association between IL-1 [beta]/[alpha] Gene Polymorphisms and Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Hippocampal Sclerosis.
26) Hippocampal sclerosis of aging has also been associated with pancerebral arteriolosclerosis, (27,28) consistent with earlier suggestions that vascular disease may be an important contributor to this condition.
Hippocampal sclerosis is the most common entity associated with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy.
Evolution of hippocampal epileptic activity during the development of hippocampal sclerosis in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.
The evident hippocampal sclerosis with signal changes on conventional MR images suggests microtissue damage at the same time.
Selective upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) transcripts and BDNF direct induction of activity independent N-methyl-o-aspartate currents in temporal lobe epilepsy patients with hippocampal sclerosis.
Hippocampal sclerosis in temporal lobe epilepsy demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging.
Surgical treatment is widely performed for patients with anti-epileptic drug-resistant MTLE, which is frequently associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) as the underlying etiology.
They found in their subjects from the Honolulu Aging Study and the Nun Study (average age 88 and 90 years, respectively) that an individual's dementia is the result of multiple pathologies, including Alzheimer's, vascular disease, Lewy body disease, and hippocampal sclerosis, rather than a single cause.
01) and hippocampal sclerosis is extremely rare in group B patients (p<0.
In such patients, 6 have hippocampal sclerosis proved by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or abnormal electrical activities detected by sphenoid electrodes monitoring.
The recent National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) revision of criteria for the pathologic diagnosis of AD recommends a minimum of 13 histologic sections to evaluate for Alzheimer disease neuropathologic change (ADNC), Lewy body disease (LBD), vascular brain injury, microvascular lesions, and hippocampal sclerosis.