histopathology

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histopathology

[‚hi·stō·pə′thäl·ə·jē]
(pathology)
A branch of pathology that deals with tissue changes associated with disease.
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2 Histopathologically, lesions are composed of loose fibrous connective tissue stroma having stellate-shaped fibroblasts with areas of myxoid degeneration resembling dental papilla covered by peripheral columnar epithelium which itself resembles inner enamel epithelium (covering of columnar epithelium is absent in odontogenic myxomas and odontogenic fibromas).
Histopathologically, the mass was diagnosed as endometriosis (Figure 2).
Among 1510 lesions, histopathologically - 1121 (74.
Results: Sixty three female breast cancer patients with histopathologically confirmed carcinoma of breast revealed elevated serum CEA levels in three stages of the disease.
Tumor mass was histopathologically diagnosed as Sebaceous gland adenocarcinoma showing irregular multilobulated appearance of several layers of germinative sebocytes (Fig.
Using open source software (Freesurfer), they delineated brain regions that correlated anatomically with the histopathologically defined Braak stages of Alzheimer's disease.
Histopathologically, DFSP is characterised by irregular, short, intersecting fascicles of tumour cells arranged in a characteristic storiform pattern.
3) Histopathologically, the lesions are characterized by hyperplasia of lymphoid follicles, eosinophilic infiltrations and proliferation of fibrocollagenous tissue and post-capillary venules.
Recently, Woo and colleagues, (3) in their 19 histopathologically cases of Xp11 RCC, found pointers for differentiating Xp11 RCC from papillary RCC: presentation in children and young adults, female gender, larger tumour size, cystic and necrotic changes, calcification, high-attenuating areas than the renal cortex on non-contrast scans, aggressive behaviour of lymph node, and distant metastasis.
In our case, there was a clinically bullous-like appearance, but histopathologically there were not dilated lymphatic vessels, lymphoedema, or a real blister formation.
The definite diagnosis is made histopathologically.
Histopathologically, fibrosis coexists with granulomatous inflammation.