historical climate

historical climate

[hi′stär·ə·kəl ′klī·mət]
(climatology)
A climate of the historical period (the past 7000 years).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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"The climate emergency requires that the United States - the world's largest historical climate polluter and largest economy - robustly engage multilaterally.
This period is modeled by 15 ensemble simulations of the historical climate with HadGEM3-A, the model underpinning the Hadley Centre's event attribution system (Christidis et al.
Unlike the treatment of traffic conditions, which considers future traffic loads in the design of pavements, these environmental conditions are assumed stationary and are based on historical climate data.
These discoveries were made possible thanks to a the "Green Arabia" programme in which SCTH is collaborating with Oxford University to trace historical climate changes on the Arabian Peninsula.
As an alternative to the use of gridded historical climate data for future climate projections, we analyzed climate projections based on measured weather data compared to the climatology provided by the best alternative method, considering only the nine sites which had a percentage of missing data on air temperature and rainfall lower than 10%, as presented in Table S1 of Supplementary Materials.
"These observations, together with computer model simulations and historical climate reconstructions from ice cores, ocean sediments and tree rings all provide strong evidence that the majority of the warming over the past century is a result of human activities.
We attribute this heterogeneity to historical climate adaptation.
The study's lead author, Ning Lin of Princeton, combined the historical climate data with computer models of future climate conditions and storm surges to project future sea levels and storm intensities.
A staging area can be determined using historical climate data to identify problem areas such as those with patterns of heavy flooding.
This fact is acknowledged in the UKCP09 report, which states, "our estimates of discrepancy [structural uncertainty] can be viewed as a likely lower bound to the true level of uncertainty associated with structural model errors." Furthermore, the structural uncertainty is estimated, in part, by comparing the model with other models in hindcasting historical climate change.
For instance, the writers/editors note they 'selected excerpts which [they] felt advanced the central narrative of the struggle for self-determination, as well as others which shed light onto the broader historical climate of the period, such as details concerning protective legislation, nascent child removal and assimilation policies' (p.

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