history of ideas


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history of ideas

an interdisciplinary approach to the historical study of ideas which seeks to overcome the fragmentation of study in the modern history of thought (e.g. separate histories of sociology, science, philosophy, literature, etc.). The approach stresses the importance of study which focuses on the interrelationships between ideas in different disciplines (e.g. ideas like ‘nature’ or naturalism’ which have importance across contexts).
References in classic literature ?
What else does the history of ideas prove, than that intellectual production changes its character in proportion as material production is changed?
Through that obscure episode, as he says, in the history of ideas in Russia, the file came into his hands, and inspired him with an ardent resolution to regain his liberty.
Editors Labushagne (philosophy of law, Leiden U., the Netherlands) and Sonnenschmidt (political theory and history of ideas, U.
By a curious fusion of Foucault's concept of epistemic "rupture" (which even Foucault rejected) with a traditional history of ideas, she avoids an obvious characteristic of Ariosto's time and place: its position on the threshold of enormous intellectual, social, and cultural changes, where traditional concepts are put into play only to be transformed into something radically different (e.g., Machiavellian "virtu").
He takes up that story as a case study in the recent transatlantic history of ideas.
While Baldo's methodology is the most familiar of the three, relying on rhetorical figures and the history of ideas, he appeals to a wide audience.
The author's approach is the history of ideas. The book's underlying question is whether concepts created by Europeans to describe European states are useful to describe Indian politics and society.
Having translated Meditations in 1984, Rubin (history of ideas, Pitzer College) here analyzes its argument.
This broad history of ideas demonstrates how the concepts of equality, freedom, evolution, and democracy, as espoused by classical thinkers of the Western humanistic tradition and the Enlightenment, have molded the world (especially politics) over the past 200 years.
In these articles Boesche (history of ideas, Occidental College) considers the methodology that allowed Tocqueville to make such accurate predictions about the US; Tocqueville's concerns about the conflicts of democracy and commerce; and the impossibility of classifying Tocqueville's philosophy.
Leppanen (history of ideas and theory of science, Goteborg U., Sweden) conducts a reading of Swedish feminist writer Elin Wagner's 1941 novel Vackarklocka (Alarm Clock), which received mixed reviews when it appeared but is now considered by many to be a feminist classic.
In this book - originally a dissertation - Heinrich Kuhn attempts to reconcile Cremonini's two reputations and to give him a place not merely in the history of ideas as the opponent of Galileo and of the new philosophy, but more importantly in the history of philosophy itself.