puff adder

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puff adder:

see viperviper,
any of a large number of heavy-bodied, poisonous snakes of the family Viperidae, characterized by erectile, hypodermic fangs. The fangs are folded back against the roof of the mouth except when the snake strikes. Vipers are distributed throughout Eurasia and Africa.
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puff adder

1. a large venomous African viper, Bitis arietans, that is yellowish-grey with brown markings and inflates its body when alarmed
2. another name for hognose snake
References in periodicals archive ?
- Eastern hognose snakes continue to be recorded on Kelleys Island.
Based on this criterion all reptile species are considered rare in Indiana with the exception of the painted turtle, common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina), eastern box turtle, six-lined racerunner, bullsnake, eastern hognose snake, northern water snake, and common garter snake.
Observations on trailing and mating behaviors in hognose snakes (Heterodon platirhinos).
Some of these are uncommon or difficult to find, such as Texas horned lizards and hognose snakes. It is suggested that sampling bias could influence the ability to record rare species.
Hognose snakes (genus Heterodon) resort to a unique combination of behaviors when threatened.
Hognose snakes are well known for feigning death or "playing dead" when captured.
He has encountered Hognose snakes, which have toxic spit, tarantulas and "utterly, utterly deadly fatal" scorpions - whose Latin name androctonus means "man killer."
Eastern hognose snakes, wood turtles, eastern box turtles, and marbled and Jefferson salamanders--all species of special concern--can be found here as well.
More than 2,400 individual turtles, snakes and salamanders were involved in the documented crimes, represented by such species as timber rattlesnakes, wood turtles, snapping turtles, Eastern hognose snakes and box turtles.
Hognose snakes, spotted turtles, spotted salamanders and spadefoot toads are among the rare reptiles and amphibians that depend on the Pine Bush plants and the fires that keep the plants thriving.