hoist

(redirected from hoists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.

hoist:

see winchwinch,
mechanical device for hauling or lifting consisting essentially of a movable drum around which a cable is wound so that rotation of the drum produces a drawing force at the end of the cable.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Hoist

A projecting beam with block and tackle, used for lifting goods; often seen above openings in the upper stories of medieval houses. Also, a platform for lifting people and/or materials. The platform is lifted by cables and contained within an open frame that is supported by the building.

Hoist

 

a cyclical or continuous-operation machine for lifting freight and passengers in special carrying devices that move along rigid vertical (sometimes inclined) guides or rails. A distinction is made among cable, chain, rack, screw, and plunger hoists, depending on the way in which the driving force is transmitted to the carriers.

A predominant position is occupied by cable hoists, in which the carrier is lifted on steel cables that pass around cable sheaves or are wound around the drums of hoisting winches. In hoists with cable sheaves, which transmit the tractive force by friction, the carrier (a cab, cage, skip, platform, trolley, or car) is balanced by another similar carrier or by a counterweight that also moves along guides. In drum hoists a counterweight reduces the load on the drive. When additional load-lifting equipment is used for balancing, the efficiency of the hoist is increased. Hoists usually have an electric drive, and sometimes a hydraulic drive.

The diversity of designs and types of hoisting machinery results from the broad sphere of application of such devices. Elevators, escalators, and occasionally paternosters have become commonplace in residential, public, administrative, and industrial buildings. Funiculars, or passenger cable hoists that operate cyclically, are used to lift passengers in cars along an inclined railway on mountains, steep banks, and other natural eminences.

Skip hoists are used to raise useful minerals and barren rock to the surface in mines, pits, and quarries, and also to charge blast furnaces. In underground mining, cage hoists are installed to raise and lower personnel, equipment, and materials. Buildings are erected with the aid of pillar, cable, and shaft construction hoists; the pressure (delivery) pipes for high-mountain hydroelectric power plants are assembled by special trolley hoists. Various types of hoists are used in maintenance plants (for example, automobile lifts) and for the servicing and minor repair of buildings, gas holders, and other high structures (for example, cherry pickers). (The Russian term, pod”emnik, is also applied to the equipment for lifting ships traveling through canals having different water levels.)

REFERENCES

Kifer, L. G., and I. I. Abramovich. Gruzopod”emnye mashiny, vol. 2. Moscow, 1949.
Pod”emniki. Moscow, 1957.
Fedorova, Z. M., and I. F. Lukin. Pod”emniki: Konstruirovanie i raschet elementovpod”emnika. Kharkov, 1971.

N. A. LOBOV

hoist

[hȯist]
(mechanical engineering)
To move or lift something by a rope-and-pulley device.
A power unit for a hoisting machine, designed to lift from a position directly above the load and therefore mounted to facilitate mobile service. Also known as winding engine.

hoist

1. In building, a machine for lifting workers and materials to upper stories during erection of the structure.
2. A machine that provides power drive to a cable drum used to pull or lift a load.

hoist

hoist
In helicopters, the mechanism by which external loads (personnel or equipment) may be raised or lowered vertically. The term also is used as a verb, meaning “to pull up loads and personnel with the hoist/winch.”

hoist

1. any apparatus or device for hoisting
2. Nautical
a. the amidships height of a sail bent to the yard with which it is hoisted
b. the difference between the set and lowered positions of this yard
3. Nautical the length of the luff of a fore-and-aft sail
4. Nautical a group of signal flags
References in periodicals archive ?
Clearly, safety becomes a major issue for electric hoists in potentially explosive environments such as oil rigs, mines and paint shops.
Yorkshire Hoist was advised on the deal by the corporate finance team at Leeds and York-based accountants Garbutt + Elliott.
ABB's delivery includes mechanical equipment for the hoist plants and shafts, electrical and control equipment, construction, electrical installation, installation supervision, site management as well as commissioning.
"As a leading supplier of spreader beams, lifting beams, coil lifters and bar tongs within the marketplace, the Harrington below-the-hook product line allows us to provide additional hook options to our customers," says Joseph Collins, founder of Hoists Direct.
ELS was both happy and confident to recommend the JDN Profi 2TI air operated hoists to their customer as the logical replacement for their existing pair of manually operated chain hoists.
Accidents involving mine hoist operations are relatively rare, but when one does occur, the outcome can be tragic if it results in personnel injuries or fatalities, or financially grim when an incident ends with equipment damage, extended production downtime, or regulatory fines and sanctions--if not all three.
More specifically, these new orders of high-speed construction hoists will be delivered to construction equipment rental customers in Denver and New York.
The hydraulic hoists replaced decades-old electric hoists.
This controller is connected by standard length 2 meter hoses to the hoist which ensures the aquanaut, hoist and load are all located within a close working environment.
A COUNCIL must pay out more than pounds 160,000 after a disabled man died when he was trapped in a ceiling track hoist in his home.
Having worked under most types of cranes and hoists available today has allowed me to develop some opinions concerning pros and cons of different systems.
Under the alliance agreement, Konecranes will take 22% in Kito from US private equity firm Carlyle Group and will sell Kito manual products, while Kito will sell wire rope hoists made by Konecranes.