hole burning

hole burning

[′hōl ‚bərn·iŋ]
(physics)
Saturation of attenuation or gain that is confined to a narrow range of frequencies (hole) within an inhomogeneously broadened transition when the saturating radiation is confined to frequencies within this range.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company is a specialist in electrical discharge machining wire eroding, spark eroding, four-axis milling and hole burning. Among its customers is the Royal Mint in South Wales.
Photochemical hole burning (PHB) has long been recognized as both a magnificent tool for ultra-high-density optical memory (1) and a fruitful spectroscopic method for detecting properties of matrix polymers (2).
Photochemical hole burning of a dye molecule in epoxy resin was first studied b Furusawa, et al.
Free-base tetraphenylporphin (TPP), obtained from Wako Pure Chemical Industries, was used without further purification as a photoreactive guest molecule whose hole burning occurs as a phototautomeric reaction of internal protons.
where [I.sub.0] is the laser intensity with the dimension of einstein/[cm.sup.2]/s, [Epsilon] is the molar extinction coefficient for the inhomogeneous line profile at the hole burning wave length and burning temperature, and R = [Delta][[Omega].sub.i]/[Delta][[Omega].sub.h] is the reciprocal initial fraction of TPP molecules within a homogeneous line width, [Delta][[Omega].sub.h], at the laser frequency.
An old technology has recently been gathering a lot of strange new names--spectral hole burning, 4-D optics, cubing, spin valves, giant magnetoresistance, and photorefractive polymer holograms, among others.
The hologram is formed by a technique called spectral hole burning. To store data, a laser carrying digital data activates the microscopic dyes to produce a hologram.
Other scientists have demonstrated this disappearing act, called "hole burning," but with thousands to millions of molecules at the same time.