hollow tile

hollow tile

[′häl·ō ′tīl]
(materials)
A hollow building block of concrete or burnt clay used for making partitions, exterior walls, or suspended floors or roofs. Also known as hollow block.

hollow tile

A structural clay tile unit with vertical hollow cells; used to build interior masonry partitions and as a backup block for brick veneer.
See also: Tile

structural clay tile

structural clay tile units
A hollow masonry building unit composed of burnt clay, shale, fireclay, or mixtures thereof, having parallel cells or cores (or both) within a single tile.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each building was constructed of concrete, steel, and hollow tile, all designed to preserve Mississippi's story for generations to come.
Since these fasteners require no caulking, they are excellent anchors for heavy holding of "problem material," such as cement, cinder blocks, hollow tile and other concrete mixes.
The walls and roof were built out of 4in-thick reinforced concrete with wall boarding for insulation, and the floors were made of 5in-thick hollow tile.
It was constructed of sturdy hollow tile blocks made by Burns' construction plant on Seventh Street and brought to the site.
A patent for the first hollow tile design was issued to Balthaser Kreischer, a New York manufacturer.
"Louisiana furnished sand and gravel; Illinois, cement, reinforcing steel and plumbing and heating fixtures; Mississippi, lumber for concrete forms, piles and interior woodwork; Georgia, hollow tile and granite; Oklahoma, gypsum tile; Alabama, structural steel; Pennsylvania, electrical conduits and fittings for plumbing and heating; Indiana, limestone; New Jersey, terra cotta and plumbing and heating fixtures; Connecticut, hardware; Texas, plaster; Missouri, interior woodwork; Tennessee, marble; West Virginia, bath tile; Ohio, bath tile; Maine, Iowa, New York, and Rhode Island, plumbing and heating fittings; Minnesota, ornamental iron and bronze."
"There are cracked doors and hollow tiles that have installed on thin layers of cement.
The other four finalists were a garlic-based feed additive to cut methane emissions from livestock, an indoor cooling system using hollow tiles, a cover for truck wheels to reduce fuel use and a giant industrial microwave for creating charcoal.