holocellulose

holocellulose

[¦häl·ō′sel·yə‚lōs]
(biochemistry)
The total polysaccharide fraction of wood, straw, and so on, that is composed of cellulose and all of the hemicelluloses and that is obtained when the extractives and the lignin are removed from the natural material.
References in periodicals archive ?
The content of holocellulose obtained is the total amount of cellulose, partial hemicellulose, and lignin retained in the whole part of the plant.
The amount of holocellulose in the fibers corresponds to the sum of all the polysaccharides in the sample.
Eucalyptus Cl 1528, known as "super clone" according to Portal Florestal (2016) shows a genetic basis of Eucalyptus urophylla x Eucalyptus grandis with an annual mean increment of 50 [m.sup.-3] [ha.sup.-1] [year.sup.-1], basic wood density of 531 kg [m.sup.-3], total lignin content of 29.24%, holocellulose content of 68.14%, gravimetric yield of 50.41% and mechanical strength of 80.82%.
The increase of relative lignin concentration limits the decomposition of holocellulose (cellulose and hemicellulose) through the LI (Moorhead et al.
The total extractives and lignin content in natura were determined by TAPPI T264 and TAPPI T222 standards and the holocellulose was determined by difference.
It was caused by not pure rice straw water and still, contains compounds such as lignin, holocellulose which inhibits P(3HB) formation.
The residue obtained after delignification is holocellulose, which needs to be subsequently washed with distilled water and dried at 60[degrees]C overnight.