homeotherm


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homeotherm

[′hō·mē·ə‚thərm]
(physiology)
An endotherm that maintains a constant body temperature, as do most mammals and birds.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the animal kingdom the other homeotherms are mammals such as goats and cows and so forth, as well as birds.
During these cruises we made observations on all homeotherms encountered; we surveyed several islands used for breeding by seabirds, and set rodent traps on 5 islands.
Studies of parasites which have developmental stages in both poikilotherm and homeotherms have suggested that thermal tolerance may be a common property of many parasitic organisms.
Therefore, this shift in diet may lead to energy constraints that can impose a digestive bottleneck in small homeotherms. For example, when offered ad libitum vegetation and no seeds, some small mammals (Karasov 1989) and birds (Degen et al.
However, because we are homeotherms - meaning internal temperatures must be regulated - a large variance from the normal resting body temperature of 37 degrees celsius can be catastrophic.
We calculated basal metabolic rate for adult swans using the standard metabolic rate (SMR) equation for homeotherms byHemmingsen [52] (in Peters [9], page 29):
Although Bergmann's rule was originally proposed for homeotherms, Bergmannian (and converse Bergmannian) clines occur in invertebrate and vertebrate ectotherms (Ray 1960; Masaki 1967, 1978; Honek 1993; Atkinson 1994; Mousseau 1997; Arnett & Gotelli 1999; Brisola Marcondes et al.
A general decrease of weight specific metabolic rate in the course of ageing is reported for homeotherms and insects (see for review McCarter 1995), however, with few exceptions (O'Connor et al.
Chickens produce 19-26 [m.sup.3]/kg body weight of C[[O.sub.2] per minute (11); comparable figures can be estimated as 13-17 for dogs and 8-11 for humans, when specific metabolic rate scales (in homeotherms) are used as [mass.sup.-0.25] (12).
(1993) because the long intrauterine period of some homeotherms would decrease the impact of environmental conditions.
Homeotherms such as elk must maintain a stable body temperature and use of thermal cover is one way elk balance heat gains and losses (Thomas et al., 1979).
Nucleotypic effect in homeotherms: Body-mass corrected basal metabolic rate of mammals is related to genome size.