hominid


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Related to hominid: Hominid evolution

hominid

any primate of the family Hominidae, which includes modern man (Homo sapiens) and the extinct precursors of man
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

hominid

[′häm·ə·nid]
(anthropology)
Any of the bipedal primates of the family Hominidae (modern or extinct); contains the genera Ardipithecus, Australopithecus, and Homo.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hitherto, the existence of the third ancestor was only a theory that would explain the origin of some fragments of the current human genome (part of the team involved in this study had already posed the existence of the extinct hominid in a previous study).
Capuchin flakes are smaller and contain fewer fractured areas than ancient hominid tools, says archaeologist David Braun of George Washington University in Washington, D.C.
We can trace our ancestry to the species called hominids, and they are believed have lived around 3.5 million years.
'This conclusion is further corroborated by electron microscope analysis of the tooth's masticatory surface, which reveals that the Bulgarian hominid had consumed hard and abrasive objects like grass, seeds, and nuts.
It is also clear that anatomical and developmental changes associated with bipedalism and changes to hominid brains would require shifts in infant care strategies.
This book is also about technological innovation, and how tool using and tool shaping emerged among hominids. Tattersall discusses not only how tools were shaped and by whom, but also the possibilities of how tool users' behaviors were influenced by those tools.
But it was also likely the hominid was helped by its neighbours, said the researchers, led by David Lordkipanidze from the Georgian State Museum in Tbilisi
The spring-like tendons that developed in humans are not nearly as apparent in early hominids and apes.
This is where Archaeologists found the skull, mandible, pelvis, and leg bones of a tiny female hominid, a newly discovered relative of our ancestors in the sediments of a large limestone cave called Liang Bua.
But Brunet holds his ground: "I'm completely confident this is a hominid." And many who have examined the skull support Brunet's hypothesis (testable scientific explanation).
The Mission Paleoanthropologique Franco-Tchadienne, led by Michael Brunet, professor at the University of Poitiers, France, said in a press release it has found six hominid specimens from the Djurab desert in northern Chad.
He said its significance rivalled that of Australopithecus africanus, the first hominid discovered 77 years ago, which confirmed the African origin of humans.