hominid


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Related to hominid: Hominid evolution

hominid

any primate of the family Hominidae, which includes modern man (Homo sapiens) and the extinct precursors of man

hominid

[′häm·ə·nid]
(anthropology)
Any of the bipedal primates of the family Hominidae (modern or extinct); contains the genera Ardipithecus, Australopithecus, and Homo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Capuchin flakes are smaller and contain fewer fractured areas than ancient hominid tools, says archaeologist David Braun of George Washington University in Washington, D.
This conclusion is further corroborated by electron microscope analysis of the tooth's masticatory surface, which reveals that the Bulgarian hominid had consumed hard and abrasive objects like grass, seeds, and nuts.
It is also clear that anatomical and developmental changes associated with bipedalism and changes to hominid brains would require shifts in infant care strategies.
This book is also about technological innovation, and how tool using and tool shaping emerged among hominids.
The spring-like tendons that developed in humans are not nearly as apparent in early hominids and apes.
Remains of a second hominid of the same size and stature has been dated to 74,000 years ago.
To determine if the skull belonged to a hominid, Brunet's team obsessed over its every detail (see diagram, p.
The Mission Paleoanthropologique Franco-Tchadienne, led by Michael Brunet, professor at the University of Poitiers, France, said in a press release it has found six hominid specimens from the Djurab desert in northern Chad.
He said its significance rivalled that of Australopithecus africanus, the first hominid discovered 77 years ago, which confirmed the African origin of humans.
And when finds are made, they have to be fitted into a vast time scale; depending on how we define the term "human", we are looking at a period of initial hominid development of between six and three million years ago.
Paleontologists will not be able to identify the species of this hominid, or human forerunner, until all the bones are removed from the rock layers where they are embedded in the Sterkfontein cave, the site of many discoveries of early-human remains.