homocentric


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homocentric

[‚häm·ə′sen·trik]
(optics)
Pertaining to rays which have the same focal point, or which are parallel. Also known as stigmatic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specifically, the philosopher often takes aim at two forms of homocentric wishful thinking that he links to the birth of the Anthropocene era.
The subject knight wants to be the model knight and the male wants to be the other male and thus desire becomes homocentric.
For the Franco-Mauritian author, this privileged space is vital to the future aspirations of all humanity given that the thought systems of these traditional peoples counterpoint simplistic homocentric ideology that threatens to destroy the ecological equilibrium that sustains life itself.
Finally, the homocentric progressionism implicit in these passages is made explicit in a lecture (appropriately enough on "The Head") delivered in the later 1830s as part of the Human Culture series, where "The instinct of the Intellect" is translated quite simply as "progress evermore.
Though he welcomes normative ecology's "productive critique of homocentric values" (2002, 5), Gilcrest suggests that it is an epistemological impossibility and an aesthetic error to claim certainty about what a biocentric perspective exactly entails.
She illustrated how this might be done using, for example, Sarton's bibliographic classification scheme (used in the critical bibliographies published in ISIS from 1946 to 1952) or by graphically visualizing Aristotle's conception of the universe as a series of homocentric spheres with epistemology at the center (Richmond, 1954, p.
In the process, she illustrates the discomforts associated respectively with these competing states of homocentric and heterocentric affection, and she reveals the interconnection between these discomforts and the paired themes of same-sex union and of bestiality that lend them expression in her play.
Kellmer's homocentric attitude toward nature is at the root of the difficulties we are having preserving the life of Earth.
Both concepts are homocentric because each envisions perpetual occupation of the planet by one species over all others; the primary objective is perpetuating and improving the lot of humans and not the optimization of the integrity and health of the planet's ecologic life support system and natural capital.
This book is more playful than its cousin, though, and includes some great homocentric shots by fetish photographers with only one out dyke photographer, Britain's Lola Flash, in the mix.
By contrast, the Semitic religions have a homocentric value-orientation, which facilitated the exploitation of nature by humanity for its own welfare.