homocentric


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homocentric

[‚häm·ə′sen·trik]
(optics)
Pertaining to rays which have the same focal point, or which are parallel. Also known as stigmatic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specifically, the philosopher often takes aim at two forms of homocentric wishful thinking that he links to the birth of the Anthropocene era.
The subject knight wants to be the model knight and the male wants to be the other male and thus desire becomes homocentric.
This internal weakness was only attenuated by its encounter with a vigorous and aggressive civilization distinctively firmly rooted in a homocentric worldview.
(18) Samso J., A Homocentric Solar Model by Abu Ja'far al-Khazin, Journal for the History of Arabic Science 1, 268-275 (1977), p.
Others would resent imaging Shakespeare as a researcher partaking of the developing quest for knowledge: "Shakespeare, in his own investigation of the instruments of learning and of judgment, leaned toward its homocentric variety" (37).
Among the topics addressed are the characteristics of the Latin version of Gersonides' Astronomy, Latin contributions to the theory and astronomical use of the pinhole camera, commentary on the two chapters in Gersonides' Astronomy that investigate the ability of homocentric models to reproduce observed planetary motions, commentary on the Latin translation made by John of Dumpno in 1260 of Ibn al-Kammadi's zij al-Mugtabis, and evidence that the correction to Ptolemy's value for the mean synodic month supposedly made by Copernicus actually originated to al-Hajjaj's Arabic version of the Almagest through Cremona's Latin translation.
This means that the "religious imperative" can be met, in Hisamatsu's view, only by surmounting the homocentric position without recourse to theism.
She draws an insightful parallel between the wild nature of women, represented by Melion's faithless lady, and the bestial world to which her betrayal condemns him, and contrasts this with the civilized and ordered world of the homocentric Arthurian court.
The squirrel hoards nuts, and the bee gathers honey, without knowing what they do, and they are thus provided for without selfishness or disgrace." Finally, the homocentric progressionism implicit in these passages is made explicit in a lecture (appropriately enough on "The Head") delivered in the later 1830s as part of the Human Culture series, where "The instinct of the Intellect" is translated quite simply as "progress evermore." (23)
Though he welcomes normative ecology's "productive critique of homocentric values" (2002, 5), Gilcrest suggests that it is an epistemological impossibility and an aesthetic error to claim certainty about what a biocentric perspective exactly entails.
She illustrated how this might be done using, for example, Sarton's bibliographic classification scheme (used in the critical bibliographies published in ISIS from 1946 to 1952) or by graphically visualizing Aristotle's conception of the universe as a series of homocentric spheres with epistemology at the center (Richmond, 1954, p.
Kellmer's homocentric attitude toward nature is at the root of the difficulties we are having preserving the life of Earth.