homoduplex


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homoduplex

[‚hō·mō′dü‚pleks]
(cell and molecular biology)
A deoxyribonucleic acid duplex in which the nitrogenous bases of the two strands are precisely complementary.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
At 32[degrees]C/s, heteroduplex and homoduplex peaks merge into a single, broad peak because of low data density.
Amplified heterozygotes have a complex melting curve shape consisting of 2 homoduplexes (wild type and mutant) and 2 heteroduplexes that are influenced by the class of single-nucleotide polymorphism and other variants within the amplicon.
Cases with >4 detectable species cannot be explained easily, because only 4 species are possible (2 homoduplexes and 2 heteroduplexes).
As mentioned above, it is possible that high-abundance mutants may become less differentiated from the wild type if enrichment is quite strong and if their homoduplex melting curves are comparable to the wild-type melting curve (4).
The altered melting curve shape is a result of the presence of both heteroduplex and homoduplex amplicons in the PCR product, vs only homoduplexes from normal samples.
Different homozygotes each produce only a single homoduplex species.
For dHPLC, it has been shown (1) that temperature conditions can be optimized by use of predictive software to improve the separation of heteroduplex and homoduplex peaks and achieve high-resolution results.
It relies on the use of a hydrophobic column based on reversed-phase liquid chromatography for the separation of heteroduplex and homoduplex DNA at specific optimized temperatures and has recently been used by several research groups to study mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation (1-6).
DHPLC separates heteroduplex and homoduplex molecules by ion-pair chromatography under partially denaturing conditions.
The continuing development of instruments with finer temperature control and fluorescence acquisition will lead to increased detail derived from heteroduplex and homoduplex contributions to the overall melting curve, providing even greater ability to identify unique sequence variants.
The resulting melting curve is a composite of both heteroduplex and homoduplex components.
The more stable homoduplex polymorphism sample (GC base pair) was distinguished by a higher [T.sub.m] than the less stable wild-type sample (AT base pair) (11,12).