homogeneous catalysis


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homogeneous catalysis

[‚hä·mə′jē·nē·əs kə′tal·ə·səs]
(chemistry)
Catalysis occurring within a single phase, usually a gas or liquid.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The researchers also focused on "homogeneous catalysis," the term for reactions using materials that have been dissolved in industrial solvents.
The full name of this particular research is "Import Substituting Technology of Catalyst Production Based on Pt (0) for Hot Solidifying Silicone Rubber Mixtures and Liquid Silicone Rubbers." It is realized by the Homogeneous Catalysis Lab at the Department of Physical Chemistry and helmed by DSci, Professor Dmitry Yakhvarov.
Keywords: Oxidation, Homogeneous catalysis, gas oils, middle distillates, hydrocarbons, hydroperoxides.
Currently, a jointly financed international team of eight doctorate-level scientists, one engineer, and a laboratory manager are working to develop new homogeneous catalysis systems.
Homogeneous Catalysis for Unreactive Bond Activation
Palladium is also an adaptable metal for homogeneous catalysis. It is now conventional to use palladium in combination with a broad variety of ligands for
In homogeneous catalysis, the starting materials and the catalytic substance are brought together in the same phase, which ensures high catalytic activity and selectivity [27].
However, homogeneous catalysis requires high pressure oxygen and/or organic solvent, incurring cost and environmental burdens [63].
Among their topics are principles of atom economy and some examples, microwave-accelerated homogeneous catalysis in water, the immobilization and compartmentalization of homogeneous catalysts, hydrogenation for forming carbon-carbon bonds, organocatalysts, and homogeneous catalyst design for synthesizing aliphatic polycarbonates and polyesters.
The committee, made up of experts in heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis, biocatalysis, photocatalysis, surface science, and materials science, examine the program's research from 1999 to 2007, its history and budget, the number and value of research grants and characteristics of researchers, influences on the program priorities, how it has advanced science and national energy goals, variations in research quality and relevance, and future recommendations.