homolog


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homolog

[′häm·ə‚läg]
(genetics)
One of a pair of homologous chromosomes. Also spelled homologue.
References in periodicals archive ?
viridis documented upregulation of a perilipin homolog (termed LSD-2) in symbiotic anemones (Ganot et al, 2011).
"There are 10 MscS-homologs in Arabidopsis and no MscL homologs," she says.
UNA the homolog of LEY/FLO, is another floral menistem identity gene, but it also plays a role in leaf development (Hofer et al., 1997).
To examine the distal axon anatomy of putative sensory neuron homologs and to confirm a sensory-neuron-like response to nerve stimulation, action potentials were elicited with an electrical current (5-10 msec, 10-50 V, capacity coupled, using a stimulus isolation unit) passed through a suction electrode of a diameter appropriate to make a tight seal on the largest posterior-projecting peripheral nerve of the pedal ganglion (most likely homologous to nerve P9 in Aplysia).
They investigated hundreds of homologs of caffeine, looking for unusual properties.
Most research characterising the roles genes play in specific phenotypes has focused on genes with homologs across many organisms.
The HDA6 homolog cloned from the cultivar Sierra and Olathe (both of Mesoamerican origin) contained six and three SNPs, respectively, as compared to the reference genome from cultivar G19833 of Andean origin (sequences are found in Supplementary Figure 4).
Global Markets Direct's, 'Delta-Like Ligand 4 (DLL4 or Drosophila Delta Homolog 4) - Pipeline Review, H1 2016', provides in depth analysis on Delta-Like Ligand 4 (DLL4 or Drosophila Delta Homolog 4) targeted pipeline therapeutics.
Possible therapies include the development of "corrector" molecules to revert ApoE4 to the less harmful ApoE3 form, and molecular targeting of DNA coregulatory elements of both ApoE and the mitochondrial support protein, Tom40 [TOMM40, translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog (yeast)].
Similarly, knocking down expression of a human homolog in cultured human cells boosted the expression of stress-response genes that, again, like yeast, occur in DNA-damage repair pathways.
In Saccharomyces cerevisiea, however, little advancement in understanding how the RPA homolog. Replication Factor A (RFA), is phosphorylated in response to DNA damage has been made.