homosexual panic


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homosexual panic

[¦hō·mə′sek·shə·wəl ′pan·ik]
(psychology)
An acute syndrome that comes as a climax of prolonged tension from unconscious homosexual conflicts or sometimes bisexual tendencies.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the ubiquitous power of homophobia present in public ideology as well as the internalisation of such ideology, Sedgwick (1992, 88) asserts that many Western men experience the social pressures arising from homophobia in the "private, psychologized form" of "homosexual panic." Only self-accepting homosexual-identified men are exempt from homosexual panic while the rest are left to constantly and anxiously guard their masculine, heterosexual subjectivities against homosexual bonds.
In terms of the lynching "spectacle" in Light in August, though, Faulkner shrewdly muddies the feminine space that constitutes homosocial desire and homosexual panic and, in so doing, (re)places it solely within the exclusive sphere of homosexual desire.
(64) The defendant in a homosexual panic defense situation is almost inevitably male; in 1992, Mison failed to find a single example of a reputed lesbian panic defense.
Eliot manages his homoerotic containment by suggesting that his illness is symptomatic of his having violated the spermatic economy: both Dino's bachelor selfishness and his occasioning Tito's homosexual panic threaten to destabilize the heteronormative world of the novel; consequently, it does not seem unreasonable, and, indeed, it might seem fitting, that he dies of what seems to be a kind of spermatorrhea.
As we have seen, Sedgwick denies that such a thing as homosexual panic occurs between women.
Known in legal circles as "homosexual panic" and utilized in courtrooms throughout the postwar era, it is actually closely tied to the dynamic found in the legal proceedings regarding male flight attendants and Title VII.
Michelle Ann Abate explores homoerotic imagery in The Sound and the Fury, and Duvall examines male homosexual panic in Light in August.
Pancho is aroused, tries to hide this arousal, but La Manuela notes and speaks that arousal, triggering homosexual panic and a heterosexual identity crisis.
Judd had illusionist panic in the way some men have homosexual panic, and it compelled him to project illusionism away from his work and, to a lesser extent, that of Flavin.
(26) His defence was 'homosexual panic': that he had a particularly hostile attitude to gay men arising in part from the fact that he was often regarded as one.
Wollaeger achieves this goal by compiling a broad array of criticism ranging from foundational texts such as a revised version of Hugh Kenner's 1948 overview "The Portrait in Perspective" and Fritz Senn's 1978 close reading "The Challenge: ignotas animum" to contemporary critiques, such as Joseph Valente's essay "Thrilled by his Touch: The Aestheticizing of Homosexual Panic in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.." It is evident from Wollaeger's choice in texts that he has carefully considered how to present a balanced representation of criticism.
It might be argued that Cervantes has given us both the saddest ("El curioso impertinente") and the funniest (Don Quijote, Part II, chapter 60) fictionalizations of homosexual panic in early modern literature, but this neither confirms nor denies that Cervantes had any homosexual experiences.