hone

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hone

1. a fine whetstone, esp for sharpening razors
2. a tool consisting of a number of fine abrasive slips held in a machine head, rotated and reciprocated to impart a smooth finish to cylinder bores, etc.

hone

[hōn]
(materials)
A fine-grit stone that is used for sharpening a cutting tool.
(mechanical engineering)
A machine for honing that consists of a holding device containing several oblong stones arranged in a circular pattern.

oilstone

A fine-grained stone used to impart a sharp edge on tools; oil is used to lubricate the rubbing surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hones bounced back as a sophomore, starting 21 of 38 games for the Cardinal as they advanced all the way to the 2008 NCAA championship game before dropping a 64-48 decision to Tennessee.
The final step is honing, often with a manually stroked, homemade hone of some kind.
One of the most versatile tools used throughout the industry today to perform maintenance on cylindrical IDs is the flexible ball-style hone.
Precision ID grinding machines are more expensive than a hone of comparable capability, according to Young.
The very round hole we get with the hone helps prevent high and low spots in the rifling, and keeps the grooves concentric with the bore, all of which contribute to accuracy," Hogan adds.
And when it comes to the cleaning, surfacing, deburring, and edge-blending of critical metal surfaces, one of the most useful and efficient tools available is the ball-style hone.
Diamond-coated hones and needle files are excellent items to stock in your retail department.
Hones, out of Southridge High School in Beaverton, was 10 yards clear of the nearest defender, and all she needed was one dribble before finding the back of the net for her first career goal, giving Oregon a 1-0 lead six minutes into the match.
Although large-diameter flexible ball-style hones are somewhat unique, they are needed to resurface liners and cylinder bores in larger engines such as the Worthington, Clark, Ingersoll-Rand and Cooper-Bessemer models used for heavy-duty applications as well as ElectroMotive-type engines used by the rail industry.
Ball-style hones are recognizable by their unique appearance: small, abrasive globules that are permanently mounted to flexible filaments.
Superhones are much narrower and shorter than conventional hones.