mesquite

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Mesquite

(məskēt`), city (1990 pop. 101,484), Dallas co., N Tex., a suburb of Dallas; inc. 1887. Manufacturing includes industrial power supplies, building materials, and medical equipment. The city's population increased by more than 50% between 1980 and 1990, and it continues to be one of the fastest-growing U.S. cities. An annual rodeo is held there every October.

mesquite

(mĭskēt`, mĕs`kēt), any plant of the genus Prosopis, leguminous spiny trees or shrubs of the family Leguminosae (pulsepulse,
in botany, common name for members of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae), a large plant family, called also the pea, or legume, family. Numbering about 650 genera and 17,000 species, the family is third largest, after the asters and the orchids.
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 family), native to tropical and subtropical regions. The seed pods of P. juliflora, a common mesquite, contain a sweet pulp eaten by numerous mammals, including domestic livestock. The mesquite still provides a staple food for many people in Mexico, who grind the bean pod into meal for bread and also use it to make a fermented beverage. The flowers are an excellent honey source. The stems yield a gum somewhat like gum arabic; the very durable wood is valued for fence posts and fuel. The charcoal of the wood is used for grilling foods. Mesquites, which grow in barren sites unsuited to most crops, are good water indicators; their roots may penetrate 50 to 60 ft (15–18 m) into the earth to find moisture. Mesquites are a characteristic part of the vegetation in arid western regions of the Americas (e.g., the chaparralchaparral
, type of plant community in which shrubs are dominant. It occurs usually in regions having from 10 to 20 in. (25–50 cm) of rainfall annually and with a Mediterranean-type climate.
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 of the SW United States). Mesquite is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Leguminosae.
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mesquite

mesquite

An airy desert tree with delicate leaves and long bean-shaped seed pods that are ground up into meal (powder) and has been used as staple food for centuries by desert dwellers. High protein, minerals, with good quantities of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron and zinc, lots of amino acid lysine with a sweet rich molasses-like flavor with a hint of caramel- blends well into smoothies, especially those made w cacao and maca. The indians loved this multi-use tree. Immature pods can be eaten or heated like vegetables. Dry, older pods can be ground into powder for flour or even a sugar substitute (they are 16% sugar) that’s why they taste so great. I simply just bite off a piece of the hardened pod and spit out the seeds.(not necessary when young and soft) Flowers can be eaten raw. The sticky tree resin can be eaten like gum. Don’t eat moldy pods- watch for black spots. Mesquite has antibacterial qualities. When damaged, the tree can sprout multiple trunks and continue growing.

mesquite

[mə′skēt]
(botany)
Any plant of the genus Prosopis, especially P. juliflora, a spiny tree or shrub bearing sugar-rich pods; an important livestock feed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Five of the seven quadrats had honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) as the dominant woody vegetation and two contained no woody vegetation (Table 1).
At the heavily grazed site, five burrows were associated with old brush piles, two with prairie mounds, one with a fence row, and one each with lotebush and honey mesquite (Table 1).
Field guides say that honey mesquite grows to just 20 feet tall and 1 foot in diameter, and most people would call it a shrub or small tree.
Mean percentage cover of woody vegetation was six (range 0-50), evenly distributed between lotebush and honey mesquite.
Importance values revealed that the five most important species at burrows were honey mesquite, bufflegrass, Lehmann lovegrass, granjeno, and fall witchgrass (Digitaria cognata), while at random sites the five most important species were Lehmann lovegrass, honey mesquite, hairy grama, threeawn (Aristida), and hogplum (Table 3).
Pods of honey mesquites and acorns of live oaks (Quercus virginiana) were collected from trees in the vicinity of Kingsville, Kleberg County, Texas.
Overstory cover varies from 30 to 100 percent, with Texas ebony (Pithecellobium flexicaule), cedar elm, and honey mesquite the dominant species.
In 1992 and 1993, vegetation in this area consisted of scattered honey mesquites and desert willows intermingled with grasses and forbs and was still of this general character in 2008.
By March, many more species flowered including Texas lantana (Lantana horrida), guayacan (Guaiacum angustifolium), sunflower (Helianthus annuus), Texas paloverde (Parkinsonia texana), honey mesquite, allthorn (Koberlinia spinosa), manzanita (Malpighia glabra), Texas persimmon (Diospyros texana), white-brush (Aloysia gratissima), Spanish dagger (Yucca treculeana), blackbrush (Acacia rigidula), anacua (Ehretia anacua), Texas baby-bonnets (Coursetia axillaris), leatherstem (Jatropha dioica), retama, and Texas prickly pear (Opuntia lindheimeri).
1988) demonstrated that honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) invades grasslands, and the trees serve as foci for bird-disseminated seeds of other woody species.
Honey mesquites in these dunes grow in moderate to loose sandy soils (3-10 cm), which coincides with the levels of compaction of sand where A.