honeycomb

(redirected from honeycombs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

honeycomb

1. a waxy structure, constructed by bees in a hive, that consists of adjacent hexagonal cells in which honey is stored, eggs are laid, and larvae develop
2. Zoology another name for reticulum

Honeycomb

Any hexagonal structure or pattern, or one resembling such a structure or pattern.

Honeycomb

 

a wax structure built by honeybees for nesting, sheltering their brood, and storing food (honey and beebread). A honeycomb consists of hexagonal prismatic cells arranged on both sides of a common partition, which may be artificial. Four different types of cells are distinguished: worker bee cells, drone cells, transition cells, and queen cells. A honeycomb in a standard hive frame consists of 140–150 g of wax. About 13 mg of wax are used to construct a worker bee cell, and about 30 mg are needed for a drone cell. The size of a honeycomb depends on the shape and size of a hive frame; the honeycombs are arranged vertically in the hive. Honeycombs in standard frames may contain as much as 4 kg of honey. The honeycomb is the most perfect structure built by insects.

honeycomb

[′hən·ē‚kōm]
(invertebrate zoology)
A mass of wax cells in the form of hexagonal prisms constructed by honeybees for their brood and honey.

honeycomb

honeycomb, 1
1. Any hexagonal structure or pattern, or one resembling such a structure or pattern.
2. Voids left in concrete owing to failure of the mortar to fill effectively the spaces among coarse aggregate particles.
3. A type of flaw in metal caused by corrosion or imperfect casting.

honeycomb

honeycomb
A low-density structural technique and material based on a hexagon-cell honeycomb sandwiched between two sheets that are too thin to be stable alone. A honeycomb can be made from aluminum foil, fiberglass, or paper. Such a structure has practically no strength against side loads, but it has exceptional strength against loads applied in line with its openings.
References in periodicals archive ?
bees will be gone; gone, and gone; honeycombs, and houses, gone; and
Motion's Qadvanced Honeycomb Shades are some of the most energy-effective window coverings available.
Humans have found inspiration in the honeycomb for thousands of years.
Failure of sandwich panels occurs by buckling of the honeycomb cell walls under the load point; panel load-bearing capacity is significantly improved by the use of stiff face sheets such as plywood.
To achieve high flexural strengths or flexural natural frequencies, the honeycomb core height is usually about 80-95 % of the total composite thickness [10, 11].
The shields can be made of any material, as it is the structure of the honeycomb that provides the strength and flexibility to cushion the impact.
A recent survey by Eldib Engineering and Research in Berkeley Heights, NJ, suggests metallic honeycomb use is on the rise in Europe.
7 billion yen in plants in Japan, Belgium and North Carolina to meet an expected surge in demand for ceramic honeycombs, against the backdrop of tightened global regulations on vehicle emissions.
In the 19th century, Charles Darwin described the honeycomb as a masterpiece of engineering that is "absolutely perfect in economising labour and wax.
To ensure a common sandwich thickness of 38 mm for both the 3-mm hardboard and 6-mm MDF face materials, honeycombs with cell wall heights 32 and 26 mm, respectively, were used.