honeyeater


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honeyeater

or

honeysucker,

common name for arboreal birds comprising some 160 species of the family Meliphagidae, and found in Australia, New Zealand, and the SW Pacific. There is a single South American genus. The plumage tends to be dull, ranging from greenish to grayish brown, with little difference between the sexes. They range in length from 4 to 17 in. (10–42.5 cm). Some species of the genus Myzomelia are more distinctly colored, with contrasting red tones, and these species show sexual dimorphism. Many members of the family have yellow or white ear patches, and one, the parson bird, or New Zealand tui (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae), is marked by two white throat feathers, said to give the appearance of a cleric's bib. The tui is a delightful songster and an excellent mimic. The family also shows a tendency to featherless patches on the face such as seen in the friarbirds and wattlebirds of Australia. Honeyeaters vary greatly in body and bill form, but all have in common a highly specialized, extendable, brushlike tongue, with a horny, pointed tip. This they use to brush up pollen and suck at nectar. Because they feed on pollen and nectar (and the insects attracted to them), honeyeaters are important pollinators. Most are species of the treetops and flowering branches, but several Australian species are adapted to open country. None are solitary. They are gregarious to varying degrees and travel in bands, particularly the helmeted honeyeater, Meliphaga cassidix, of Australia. Nest and nesting habits also vary, but none of the honeyeaters are ground nesters. The number of eggs per clutch ranges from two in the tropical species to four in those of temperate areas. Male participation in rearing also varies, but most help in feeding the young. Honeyeaters are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeriformes, family Meliphagidae.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A wild-caught New Holland honeyeater (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae), from the southeastern suburbs of Melbourne, Australia, was presented with suspect injuries consistent with a head trauma.
Without spoiling any surprises, suffice it to say that The Honeyeater is about far more than Eulalia and Fabio; but presents a history of events that intertwine and ultimately tell of women transformed.
Pollination syndrome was coded as having 4 character states [bird (includes hummingbirds, sunbirds, and honeyeaters, all conferring similar floral characters with little overlap in biogeographic distribution), insect (includes bee, beetle, fly, moth) bat and, non-flying mammal] or 8 character states [bee, beetle, bat, moth, honeyeaters, sunbirds, hummingbirds and non-flying mammal].
Then he begins a series of flawless imitations of many of the other birds that share his home--satin bowerbirds, rosella parrots, yellow honeyeaters, kookaburras.
All isolates from birds from North America were closely related and clustered in clade EA 2, along with 3 isolates from birds from Australia (honeyeater, wren, and fantail) and an isolate from a human with diarrhea (I2005002880 #36).
After setting up camp the team encountered a new species of bird ( a red-faced and wattled honeyeater. The next day they saw Berlepsch's six-wired "lost" Bird of Paradise, so-called because of the wires that extend from its head in place of a crest.
Cree of the Lewin's honeyeater. Plink chee chee chee chee of the yellow robin again.
To celebrate, the king rail sometimes says hip hip hurrah/ In Australia, the grey whistler sometimes says TIC TAC TOE, while the MacLeay's honeyeater screams a free TV.
And in Australia, the colourful honeyeater birds feed only on nectar, and are unable to breed if there are not enough available.
The Australian dusky grasswren (Amytornis purnelli, Maluridae), the slate-backed thornbill (Acanthiza robustirostris, Acanthizidae), and the grey-headed honeyeater (Licheneostomus keartlandi, Meliphagi-dae) are the only Australian birds endemic to the central desert.
Linking landscape data with population viability analysis: management of the helmeted honeyeater (Lichenostomus melanops cassidix).