honky-tonk


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

honky-tonk

1. a style of ragtime piano-playing, esp on a tinny-sounding piano
2. a type of country music, usually performed by a small band with electric and steel guitars
References in periodicals archive ?
Watson has been playing his roots-based honky-tonk for more than 20 years.
As a teen he performed on regional radio and fell under the sway of honky-tonk star Williams, whom he met at a show in Beaumont.
A 13-minute film of the band's last visit to the US, Ashtrays & Tables, by Liverpool photographer Mark McNulty, is on display at The Bluecoat as part of its current Honky-Tonk exhibition.
Incorporating upbeat guitar riffs, boy-band harmonies and honky-tonk piano, I reckon they're going to be massive so get in early and impress your mates.
BILL KIRCHEN: ``Hammer of the Honky-Tonk Gods'' (Proper) - Three and one half stars
Jean Nouvel's phallic tower in Barcelona, Torre Agbar, clad in frosted glass and corrugated aluminium shaded from dark red to light blue, vibrantly lit at night, is pure fiesta and blended curiously with a honky-tonk local street carnival at its base.
Horenstein's portrait of the famous honky-tonk proprietor greets visitors at the entrance to the exhibition.
Needless to say, Johnny Cash's prison songs, love ballads, and honky-tonk humor were no more a part of Shriver's youthful album collection than were Porter or Rodgers and Hammerstein.
Those Honky-Tonk Insurance Company Blues I got those Honky-Tonk Insurance Company Blues.
Also tinged with country, bluegrass, and a little honky-tonk, they've got an early Blood in the Saddle (ex-Dils guys) sound.
A new hope and intimacy in Harcourt's writing is clearly visible in Those Crimson Tears but the jewel in his crown is This One's For You, a sublime, honky-tonk lament to new love.
I ended up getting a tape called Honky-Tonk Classics.