honky-tonk


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honky-tonk

1. a style of ragtime piano-playing, esp on a tinny-sounding piano
2. a type of country music, usually performed by a small band with electric and steel guitars
References in periodicals archive ?
Griswold's honky-tonk sound has evolved from the genre of cowpunk, according to a press release.
They're great songs, but let's face it: Young's at his most fun when he's got a full-on honky-tonk going on.
The honky-tonk band Whitey Morgan and the 78's perform at 9:30 p.
99) consists of four CDs covering rock, romance, vintage honky-tonk and acoustic material.
The premiere of For Ella (to music sung by Ella Fitzgerald) featured Kozlova and Victoria Rinaldi, with swiveling-hips and neon-dipped pony-tails, as the high-kicking, honky-tonk enticers of four swains.
According to Webster's dictionary, a honky-tonk is a "cheap nightclub or dance hall.
Keith's honky-tonk style garnered national attention when "American Soldier," his patriotic salute to the men and women of the military, became the number one song in America over Independence Day weekend in 2002.
Elsewhere, on "Restless, Restless," Levecque's music moves at a slow, steady honky-tonk pace.
Beginning with 1963's chart-topping ``Act Naturally'' (later covered by the Beatles), the set includes all of Owens' honky-tonk hits from the 1960s through to a 1988 duet with Dwight Yoakam on ``Streets of Bakersfield'' (oddly sequenced here as the third cut).
When the song was released, it became a phenomenal hit within six weeks, dominating the country music and top 40 radio playlists as well as honky-tonk dance halls.
Now, he brings his body-and-soul songwriting and honky-tonk driven style to disc.
The honky-tonk tune has a simmering, boozy and bluesy feel, moving with a casual confidence and a heck of a lot of soul.