honky-tonk

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Related to honky-tonks: Western swing

honky-tonk

1. a style of ragtime piano-playing, esp on a tinny-sounding piano
2. a type of country music, usually performed by a small band with electric and steel guitars
References in periodicals archive ?
Classic honky-tonk country is the backbone of Dale Watson's sound.
Ketchel knew all the beer parlors and honky-tonks in New York and, seemingly, all the women who frequented them.
As someone who took to the road at age 15, West has seen more than her share of honky-tonks, small towns and fellow travellers, and their ghosts live on in her lyrics.
After all, didn't it start in the honky-tonks of New Orleans?
The compact Urban Market, open since February 2007, is close to performing and visual arts venues, professional sports complexes, and, of course, a host of tourist destinations, restaurants, and high-octane honky-tonks.
He has spent a lifetime playing honky-tonks and bars and it is only within the last few years that he has started touring the wider US, Europe and the UK.
But preservationists say it could destroy the character of the area, which is sprinkled with honky-tonks and restaurants.
When the Boys were young, their parents divorced, and the three grew up gigging with their father in honky-tonks, mostly between Nashville, Tenn.
Some of Nashville's most prominent honky-tonks occupy other brick warehouse buildings that once held cotton, corn, and tobacco.
The Hall of Fame opened a new $37 million museum in 2001, near the historic Ryman Auditorium and the honky-tonks district of Lower Broadway, in Nashville.
At 16, Anneth compulsively sneaks out at night to flirt and drink at honky-tonks, dancing to the latest songs by Elvis, Patsy Cline, and Sam Cooke.
At the Broken Spoken, the last of the old-time Texas honky-tonks, everyone becomes Texan when two-stepping across the dance floor.