hook

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hook

1. a piece of material, usually metal, curved or bent and used to suspend, catch, hold, or pull something
2. short for fish-hook
3. 
a. a sharp bend or angle in a geological formation, esp a river
b. a sharply curved spit of land
4. Boxing a short swinging blow delivered from the side with the elbow bent
5. Cricket a shot in which the ball is hit square on the leg side with the bat held horizontally
6. Golf a shot that causes the ball to swerve sharply from right to left
7. Surfing the top of a breaking wave
8. Ice hockey the act of hooking an opposing player
9. Music a stroke added to the stem of a written or printed note to indicate time values shorter than a crotchet
10. another name for a sickle
11. a nautical word for anchor
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Hook

 

in machine building, a part of load-lifting machines that suspends loads or lifting attachments on the cables or chains of hoisting mechanisms (load hook); a part of transport machines that transmits tractive forces (coupling hook, draw hook), as between a tractor and trailer. Hooks are made as single hooks or double (sister) hooks. Load hooks made of cast or unit-forged steel have load-lifting capacities of up to 75 tons; laminated load hooks made of drop-forged steel plates have load-lifting capaci-ties of more than 75 tons. Coupling hooks are usually forged or cast single hooks. The main characteristics of hooks are standardized.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

hook

[hu̇k]
(computer science)
A modification of a computer program to add instructions to an existing part of the program.
(design engineering)
A piece of hard material, especially metal, formed into a curve for catching, holding, or pulling something.
(electronics)
A circuit phenomenon occurring in four-zone transistors, wherein hole or electron conduction can occur in opposite directions to produce voltage drops that encourage other types of conduction.
(geography)
The end of a spit of land that is turned toward shore. Also known as hooked spit; recurved spit.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hook

hood, 1
1. A curved or bent metal device used for attachment.
2. A bend in the end of a reinforcing bar; also see hooked bar.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

HOOK

(1)
? Object Oriented Kernel. Delphia. An object-oriented extension of Delphia Prolog.

hook

(programming)
A software or hardware feature included in order to simplify later additions or changes by a user.

For example, a simple program that prints numbers might always print them in base 10, but a more flexible version would let a variable determine what base to use; setting the variable to 5 would make the program print numbers in base 5. The variable is a simple hook. An even more flexible program might examine the variable and treat a value of 16 or less as the base to use, but treat any other number as the address of a user-supplied routine for printing a number. This is a hairy but powerful hook; one can then write a routine to print numbers as Roman numerals, say, or as Hebrew characters, and plug it into the program through the hook.

Often the difference between a good program and a superb one is that the latter has useful hooks in judiciously chosen places. Both may do the original job about equally well, but the one with the hooks is much more flexible for future expansion of capabilities.

Emacs, for example, is *all* hooks.

The term "user exit" is synonymous but much more formal and less hackish.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

hook

In programming, instructions that provide breakpoints for future expansion. Hooks may be changed to call some outside routine or function or may be places where additional processing is added. See also switch hook.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
We hypothesized that new students who hooked up, both women and men, would endorse more sexually permissive attitudes (Hypothesis 1) and perceive hooking up as more common on campus (Hypothesis 2) than those who did not hook up.
Hypothesis 5 was that hooking up would increase new students' risk for unwanted sex, and Hypothesis 6 was that hooking up would increase risk for women more than for men.
We examined rates and correlates of hooking up during students' initial transition to a residential college.
of deep hooking were 0% for both circle and J hooks that caught yellowfin tuna.
This is largely due to studies finding that circle hooks maintain catch rates but reduce rates of deep hooking compared with J hooks in billfishes (see Serafy et al., 2009, for review).
The greater effectiveness of J hooks at hooking fish once they struck generally held across the three species and dolphinfish and the two taxa groups.
Hooking location and the presence or absence of bleeding were noted for 123 blue marlin, 272 white marlin, and 132 sailfish caught on natural baits rigged with either J hooks or circle hooks (Table 1).
The occurrence of trauma (bleeding) mirrored the pattern observed for internal hooking locations between the two hook types for each of the three billfishes.
"And while gut hooking is the primary concern, it's not the only objective.
Most manufacturers have used a 90-degree set for freshwater applications, but gut hooking continues to some small degree.
Research suggests that for billfish, severely offset circle hooks might prove less effective, while slight or no offsets decrease injurious deep hooking. For striped bass, there was no difference in mortality between offset and non-offset hooks, showing that hook tests should be performed on a species-specific basis.
One way to try to reduce eye-hooking is to use a smaller circle, but not to the point of trading off hooking efficiency.