hopperburn

hopperburn

[′häp·ər ‚bərn]
(plant pathology)
A disease of potato and peanut plants caused by a leafhopper which secretes a toxic substance on the leaves, causing browning and shriveling.
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Potato leafhopper is problematic for maple production because salivary toxins introduced during feeding subsequently change leaf appearance due to a localized pattern of necrosis called hopperburn, which also cups leaves (Frank et al.
Look for browning and curling of plants' leaves, called "hopperburn." One of the varieties we grow, 'King Harry,' has pretty good resistance.
Mechanisms oh Hopperburn: An overview of Insect Taxonomy, Behavior, and Physiology.
Other topics include the nature of the feeding stimuli in hopperburn initiation, fecal residues of veterinary parasiticides, egg dumping in insects, the ecology of interactions between weeds and arthropods, and the natural history of plague.
Potato leafhopper feeding injury symptoms include yellowing of leaf tips (known as hopperburn), stunting, reduced biomass, and decreased leaf protein concentration (Hutchins and Pedigo, 1989; Hutchins et al., 1989; Ecale and Backus, 1995; Lefko et al., 2000a).
Rather, PLH-resistant cultivars tolerated high levels of PLH by having more nodes, longer internodes, longer stems, and less hopperburn than the PLH-susceptible cultivars (Lefko et al., 2000a).
Feeding by a large number of planthoppers causes drying of the rice leaves and wilting of the tillers, a phenomenon called "hopperburn" (Tan et al.
Los danos de alimentacion de los tiflocibinos en particular, referidos como hopperburn, han merecido especial atencion en el mundo por los severos efectos relacionados con la produccion de secreciones salivales y la accion mecanica de los estiletes durante la prueba e ingestion (Backus et al., 2005).
Mechanisms of hopperburn: An overview of Insect Taxonomy, Behavior and Physiology.
The crop physiological disruptions are expressed as hopperburn symptoms on the leaves (Kabrick & Bacus 1990; Eacle & Backus 1994).