hop

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Related to hopping: Channel Hopping

hop,

herbaceous perennial vine of the family Moraceae (mulberrymulberry,
common name for the Moraceae, a family of deciduous or evergreen trees and shrubs, often climbing, mostly of pantropical distribution, and characterized by milky sap. Several genera bear edible fruit, e.g.
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 family), widely cultivated since early times for brewing purposes. The commercial hop (Humulus lupulus) is native to Eurasia but is now grown in many temperate regions, notably England, Germany, the United States, South America, and Australia. The conelike mature female flowers, called hops, are borne on different plants from the male; their loose scales contain lupulin, a yellow resinous powder that is added to beer to impart a bitter flavor and is used medicinally as a tonic and soporific. Oil of hops is used for some perfumes, and the hop stem is used for fiber. The fruit of the unrelated hop tree (Ptelea trifoliata) of North America is occasionally used as a substitute for hops. Hops are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Urticales, family Moraceae.

hop

[häp]
(botany)
Humulus lupulus. A dioecious liana of the order Urticales distinguished by herbaceous vines produced from a perennial crown; the inflorescence, a catkin, of the female plant is used commercially for beer production.
(communications)
A single reflection of a radio wave from the ionosphere back to the earth in traveling from one point to another.

hop

hop
i. The travel of a radio wave to the ionosphere and back to earth. The number of hops a radio signal has experienced is usually designated by the expression “one hop,” “two hop,” “multihop,” etc. The number of hops is called the order of reflection.
ii. A very short flight.
iii. As used in electronic warfare, a jump from one EM (electromagnetic) frequency to another by an ECCM (electronic counter-countermeasures) subsystem.

hop

1
Old-fashioned informal a dance, esp one at which popular music is played

hop

2
Obsolete slang opium or any other narcotic drug

hop

3
1. any climbing plant of the N temperate genus Humulus, esp H. lupulus, which has green conelike female flowers and clusters of small male flowers: family Cannabiaceae (or Cannabidaceae)
2. hop garden a field of hops

hop

(messaging)
One point-to-point transmission in a series required to get a message from point A to point B on a store and forward network. On such networks (including UUCPNET and FidoNet), an important inter-machine metric is the hop count of the shortest path between them. This can be more significant than their geographical separation.

Each exclamation mark in a bang path represents one hop.

hop

(networking)
One direct host-to-host connection forming part of the route between two hosts in a routed network such as the Internet. Some protocols place an upper limit on the hop count in order to detect routing loops.

hop

(jargon, networking)
To log in to a remote computer, especially via rlogin or telnet. "I'll hop over to foovax to FTP that."

hop

The link between two network nodes. See hop count and hop off.
References in periodicals archive ?
"If I can get the same results dry hopping in one day by running it through the machine for an hour or two versus [steeping the hops for a] week or two, I can finish that beer out and use that tank again to brew something else.
Until this work, self-propelled robots were "like tables with moving legs," says Marc Raibert, a pioneer of hopping and running robots who now heads a company called Boston Dynamics in Cambridge, Mass.
The machines now under development in California and New Mexico represent a new type of hopping robot because they don't maintain continuous motion or balance.
Compared with Sojourner, which roamed within only a few meters of its lander, the new generation of hopping machines looks toward much broader horizons--in space or on Earth.
Naturally, the higher the hop rate, the harder it is to detect the hopping signal.
While detecting hoppers is straightforward, intercepting the hopping signal is more challenging.
One is to sweep the hopping range with a fast tuning receiver, then perform a quick DF measurement when you find it.