horizontal parallax


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horizontal parallax

See diurnal parallax.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

horizontal parallax

[‚här·ə′zänt·əl ′par·ə‚laks]
(astronomy)
The geocentric parallax of a celestial object when it is rising or setting.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

absolute stereoscopic parallax

absolute stereoscopic parallaxclick for a larger image
In the above illustration, the principal points of the photographs can be accepted as the nadir positions. Both the top and base objects are clearly visible. The absolute stereoscopic parallax is 12.36 mm in this case, i.e., the sum of the distances of the corresponding images from their respective nadirs. Differential parallax in this case is the difference in the absolute stereoscopic parallax at the top and base objects being measured, i.e., 12.3−12.32 = 0.04.
The change in position of an image from one photograph to the next overlapping photograph caused by the aircraft's motion. It is the algebraic difference between their respective nadirs, measured in a horizontal plane and perpendicular to the air base. It is also the algebraic sum of the distances of corresponding images from their respective nadirs. It is always measured parallel to the flight line. Also called x-parallax, linear parallax, horizontal parallax, absolute parallax, stereoscopic parallax, and primary parallax.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
8, we find that the minimum parallaxes of image 4 and 13 exceed -[W.sub.i] x 5%, which indicates excessive horizontal parallax is liable to cause visual fatigue.
9-(a) the scores of image 1 and image 4 are considerably improved (from 3.2 to 3.5, 2.3 to 2.8, respectively), which shows the proposed method is efficient at reducing visual fatigue in most cases when excessive horizontal parallax occurs.
The hologram comprised horizontal parallax strips dispersed vertically in a rectangular array.
Their method converts the input images from a series of CCD-camera views of the subject taken in ambient light conditions, into a Fourier transform that, when illuminated with a laser, shows as a 3D real image hologram with vertical and horizontal parallax. The next stage in development is to produce a white-light viewable hologram from this, and to increase the image size and resolution.
In a DIBR system with shift-sensor camera setup, there are only horizontal parallaxes contained in the generated stereo pair (see equations in (1)).