horse chestnut


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Related to horse chestnut: horse chestnut tree

horse chestnut,

common name for some members of the Hippocastanaceae, a family of trees and shrubs of the north temperate zones and of South America. The horse chestnut tree, Aesculus hippocastanum, a native of the Balkan peninsula, is now cultivated in many countries for shade and ornament. Buckeyes are several similar but often smaller North American species of the same genus. Horse chestnuts and buckeyes (as the nuts too are called) somewhat resemble true chestnuts in appearance but are edible only after careful preparation. Some Native Americans ate buckeyes in large quantity after thorough roasting or leaching. Buckeyes, with their eyelike markings, are still carried as charms by some rural people. Ohio is called the Buckeye State from the prevalence of the Ohio buckeye, A. glabra. The wood of the horse chestnut and of the buckeye is soft; it has been used for paper pulp and for carpentry, woodenware, and other similar purposes. A compound derived from the buckeye, aesculin, is a pharmaceutical used as an anti-inflammatory. The only other genus of the family is Billia, evergreens ranging from Colombia to Mexico. Horse chestnuts are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Sapindales, family Hippocastanallae.
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horse chestnut

[′hȯrs ¦ches·nət]
(botany)
Aesculus hippocastanum. An ornamental buckeye tree in the order Sapindales, usually with seven leaflets per leaf and resinous buds.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

horse chestnut

1. any of several trees of the genus Aesculus, esp the Eurasian A. hippocastanum, having palmate leaves, erect clusters of white, pink, or red flowers, and brown shiny inedible nuts enclosed in a spiky bur: family Hippocastanaceae
2. the nut of this tree
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Its caterpillars devour horse chestnut leaves, turning them brown and causing the tree to produce smaller conkers.
"The Forestry Commission is urg-ing people not to cut down their horse chestnut trees if they appear to be dying or in poor condition this summer, without having a reputable tree surgeon check what the problem is first.
* AUTUMN GLORY: Horse Chestnuts should produce a bumper crops of conkers this year * GOOD SHOW: Dahlias and carnations were on show at Harrogate
(12) Its ability to support healthy blood circulation has made horse chestnut a popular treatment for varicose veins.
Horse chestnut trees are not native to Britain - they were first introduced in the late 16th century from the Balkans and before that, conkers was played with hazel or cobnuts or even snail shells.
Also nominated from North Wales is the Pentrefoelas Horse Chestnut.
The latest issue of the Royal Horticultural Society magazine, The Garden, arrived at home and there was the answer - horse chestnut leaf miner.
This is the crux of the matter - the council should have spoken to the folk whose homes gaze out on these horse chestnuts.
The Campaign For Real Conkers says many conkers have fallen early from yellowing horse chestnut trees before they are ripe enough to be used for the popular pastime.
ANSWERS: 1 Catarrh following a cold in the head; 2 Kinder Scout; 3 Swan; 4 Diana; 5 The horse chestnut; 6 A4; 7 A potato; 8 Frankie Goes To Hollywood, Huey Lewis and the News, and Jennifer Rush; 9 The Fat Duck; 10 A freshwater fish.
Acheeky little beastie called the Horse Chestnut Leaf Miner is nibbling our nuts, making them droopy and causing them to fall off early.
Site 97D007-119, 121, 125 site, Weston Lane, Bulkington, tree preservation order to six trees (two cedar, one horse chestnut and one ash), NBBC.