horse chestnut tree


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horse chestnut tree

horse chestnut tree

Grows over 100 ft (35m) Nuts are moderately poisonous. Toxin is destroyed by roasting or boiling. Seeds contain a saponin called Escin, which is used externally to reduce swelling and increase skin tissue tone, increasing circulation and encouraging flexibility. Be careful.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz
References in periodicals archive ?
The veteran tree on the National Trust's Hughenden estate in Buckinghamshire has a girth of 7.33 metres (more than 24ft), clinching its status as the largest horse chestnut tree in the UK on the National Tree Register.
Prof Evans said: "Many horse chestnut trees across the UK have been disfigured by attack from the larvae of Cameraria ohridella - better known as the horse chestnut leaf miner moth - which was first identified in Macedonia in 1984.
The event was the brainchild of Grace Kearney, who saw potential in the 52 horse chestnut trees that surround the village green.
Here are some of the controversies that have hit Top Gear: 2003: Jeremy Clarkson drives a pick-up into a horse chestnut tree in a car park in Somerset, to test the strength of a Toyota.
Now Professor Hugh Evans, who leads a project for Forest Research in Wales, says the horse chestnut tree itself is in jeopardy because the leaf miner bug disfigures its leaves as it feeds by "mining" inside them, causing the leaves to go brown in mid or late summer.
The is the The fruit of the horse chestnut tree was first used for conker fights 200 years ago as a replacement to hazel, cobnut and snail shells.
Coun Frank Lott, chairman of North Tyneside Council, said: "We were delighted two years ago to receive one of only 10 saplings of the horse chestnut tree that stood outside Anne Frank's house in Amsterdam.
Mr Connelly, who was working on a horse chestnut tree in Guyhirn, Cambridgeshire, would have bled to death within minutes if colleagues and medics had not treated him so quickly.
It is proposed the store would open seven days-a-week between 9am and 9pm and a protected horse chestnut tree on the site will not be touched.
THE other day I saw some children collecting conkers from under a horse chestnut tree and it was one of those timeless sights which I hope will never be lost.
To test the durability of a Toyota pick-up he drove it into the 30-year-old white horse chestnut tree in Churchill, North Somerset.