horseflesh


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horseflesh

horses collectively
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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And above all," thought Prince Andrew, "one believes in him because he's Russian, despite the novel by Genlis and the French proverbs, and because his voice shook when he said: 'What they have brought us to!' and had a sob in it when he said he would 'make them eat horseflesh!'"
Both were too gaudy, too slangey, too odorous of cigars, and too much given to horseflesh; the latter characteristic being exemplified in the room by its decorations, and in the men by their conversation.
The apathy of these poor soldiers can only be conceived by those who remember to have crossed vast deserts of snow without other perspective than a snow horizon, without other drink than snow, without other bed than snow, without other food than snow or a few frozen beet-roots, a few handfuls of flour, or a little horseflesh. Dying of hunger, thirst, fatigue, and want of sleep, these unfortunates reached a shore where they saw before them wood, provisions, innumerable camp equipages, and carriages,--in short a whole town at their service.
Unfortunately, the qualities of this horse were so well concealed under his strange-colored hide and his unaccountable gait, that at a time when everybody was a connoisseur in horseflesh, the appearance of the aforesaid pony at Meung--which place he had entered about a quarter of an hour before, by the gate of Beaugency--produced an unfavorable feeling, which extended to his rider.
"He had a great eye for horseflesh," said Magers, who met Marcocchio in 1992 when Magers sought the bloodstock agent's advice about selling a mare.
* If you judge horseflesh by, "one white foot, eye him; two white feet, try him; three white feet, buy him; four white feet and a white nose, fed him to the crows," you've owned some good horses.
A rodeo of horseflesh, It's a hypocritical display.
The last on that list turns out to be the case with author Mark Felton's Ghost Riders, about the preservation of some of the most famous horseflesh on the planet, the Lipizzaners, known for their elegant appearance and precise execution of classic dressage.
Bone-chilling quote: "There's just something about horseflesh. I crave it."
Nobody wants to see horses beaten up, but I can assure you a smack on the bottom of half a ton of horseflesh in the heat of a race with a felt-covered stick is in no way going to cause discomfort.
George Bernard Shaw, while working as an art critic, described these paintings as "romance and horseflesh".