hose

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hose,

covering for the legs and feet. In the Middle Ages the leg was bound from the ankle to the knee with hides or cloth and then cross-gartered with thongs or strips of cloth; later a loose trouser, bound at the ankle, was worn. As the lower legs of the trousers became more fitted, they were called breeches, and as the breeches were shortened to the knee, fitted cloths called hose (also known by the French chausses) were worn. By the 12th cent. feet were added to the hose. As breeches grew shorter, hose became longer; by c.1450 the hose reached the hips and were attached by points (laces) to the doublet. By c.1490 the breeches and hose formed one garment; thus tights were first known. Silk and velvet were used, as was wool, and color became extravagant. The tights were multicolored and often each leg was in a contrasting color. As the upper part of the hose became more decorated and puffed out, a separation occurred (c.1500); the upper part was called trunk hose, and the leg coverings were for the first time called stockings and recognized as a separate accessory of dress. Knitted hose were first known in Scotland (1499); in France, Henry II is said to have worn (c.1559) the first knitted silk hose. Knitting thereafter became general, and machines came into use after 1589. Colored and embroidered hose were worn in the 17th cent., though white silk was the fashion. In the 17th cent. the decorative boot hose of the cavalier were of white linen and lace. Cotton came into use after 1680. Nylon, because of its strength and elasticity, became the leading hosiery fiber after World War II. In the 1960s women began to wear pantyhose, a one-piece garment that extends from waist to feet. As men's trousers grew longer their stockings grew shorter, and the word sock came into use. Women's hose, although hidden until modern times by their long skirts, have always been an important part of their costume.

Bibliography

See M. N. Grass, History of Hosiery (1956).

What does it mean when you dream about a hose?

A hose is an obvious phallic symbol. Hoses are also used for washing and for watering (i.e., nurturing something that is growing), and a dream about hoses can reflect either meaning. Also note the slang meaning of “hosed”—namely, being cheated.

hose

[hōz]
(design engineering)
Flexible tube used for conveying fluids.

hose

(1)
To make non-functional or greatly degraded in performance. "That big ray-tracing program really hoses the system." See hosed.

hose

(2)
A narrow channel through which data flows under pressure. Generally denotes data paths that represent performance bottlenecks.

hose

(3)
Cabling, especially thick Ethernet cable. This is sometimes called "bit hose" or "hosery" (a play on "hosiery") or "etherhose". See also washing machine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hosepipes and sprinklers will not be allowed to be used for watering public parks and allotments, as well as for filling swimming pools, paddling pools, ponds and fountains.
USING hosepipes to water gardens and clean cars will be outlawed because of a water supply crisis, water company bosses will announce today.
We are all under a hosepipe ban and there is a drought order coming our way - because he has money he thinks he is above it.
While some parts of the South saw low rivers and resevoirs and even faced hosepipe bans after the driest June since 1995, the UK was in fact 46 per cent wetter than average in July and parts of the country, including Merseyside, faced devastating floods.
His rallying call comes after TV gardener Monty Don urged gardeners to lobby the Government for a change in the current law, which allows the use of hosepipes to fill swimming pools but not to water plants or lawns.
Water companies say it would be irresponsible to lift the hosepipe ban at the moment because of serious water shortages and the possibility of a dry summer.
A Hosepipe bans are not introduced solely because of spells of dry weather, Simon.
Earlier this month seven water companies across east and southern England announced hosepipe bans would come into force before Easter.
David Essex, water strategy manager for Severn Trent, said: "A hosepipe ban for customers is a long way off yet, but it has been the driest start to the year for a long time.
Summary: Millions of householders have been warned of a possible hosepipe ban after the winter's floods in Cumbria were followed by drought.
The dry weather of 2005 and 2006 led to empty reservoirs and hosepipe bans that affected more than 10 million people.
Gardeners' World presenter Monty Don has called for a change in the law over hosepipe bans.