hot carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle

hot carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle

[′hät ¦kär·bən ¦nī·trə·jən ¦äk·sə·jən ‚sī·kəl]
(nuclear physics)
A modification of the carbon-nitrogen cycle that occurs at the high temperatures and high densities encountered in stellar explosions such as novae and supernovae, in which a nitrogen-13 nucleus captures a proton to form oxygen-14 before it can undergo beta decay to carbon-13. Also known as fast carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle.