hot spot


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hot spot

1. an area of potential violence or political unrest
2. 
a. any local area of high temperature in a part of an engine, etc.
b. part of the inlet manifold of a paraffin engine that is heated by exhaust gases to vaporize the fuel
3. Computing a company that provides wireless access to the internet for users of portable computers or the places from which the internet can be accessed in this manner
4. Med
a. a small area on the surface of or within a body with an exceptionally high concentration of radioactivity or of some chemical or mineral considered harmful
b. a similar area that generates an abnormal amount of heat, as revealed by thermography
5. Genetics a part of a chromosome that has a tendency for mutation or recombination

hot spot

See radio-source structure.

hot spot

[′hät ‚spät]
(chemical engineering)
An area or point within a reaction system at which the temperature is appreciably higher than in the bulk of the reactor; usually locates the reaction front.
(computer science)
A word in a multiprocessor memory that several processors attempt to access simultaneously, creating a conflict or bottleneck.
(engineering)
An area in a pipeline that is subject to excessive corrosion.
(forestry)
A forest region where fires occur at frequent intervals.
(graphic arts)
A region of excessive illumination on a photo.
(cell and molecular biology)
A site in a gene at which there is an unusually high frequency of mutation.
(nucleonics)
A surface area of higher than average radioactivity.
A part of a reactor fuel surface element that has become overheated.
(physics)
A localized region with temperature higher than the surroundings.

hot spot

(1)
(primarily used by C/Unix programmers, but spreading) It is received wisdom that in most programs, less than 10% of the code eats 90% of the execution time; if one were to graph instruction visits versus code addresses, one would typically see a few huge spikes amidst a lot of low-level noise. Such spikes are called "hot spots" and are good candidates for heavy optimisation or hand-hacking. The term is especially used of tight loops and recursions in the code's central algorithm, as opposed to (say) initial set-up costs or large but infrequent I/O operations.

See tune, bum, hand-hacking.

hot spot

(2)
The active location of a cursor on a bit-map display. "Put the mouse's hot spot on the "ON" widget and click the left button."

hot spot

(3)
A screen region that is sensitive to mouse clicks, which trigger some action. Hypertext help screens are an example, in which a hot spot exists in the vicinity of any word for which additional material is available.

hot spot

(4)
In a massively parallel computer with shared memory, the one location that all 10,000 processors are trying to read or write at once (perhaps because they are all doing a busy-wait on the same lock).

hot spot

(5)
More generally, any place in a hardware design that turns into a performance bottleneck due to resource contention.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Rahimyar Khan, two hot spots of white fly, Aphid (6),
For more information on hot spots visit the website www.petwave.com/Dogs/Dog-Health-Center/Skin-Disorders/Hot-Spots.aspx.
OCV could be considered in several situations in DRC: in cholera hot spot health zones that report a notable increase in reported cases; in non-hot spot health zones adjacent to hot spot health zones, when such increases occur; in health zones along the Congo River, when surveillance reports cholera in upstream communities; during acute emergencies in non-cholera endemic areas of DRC where suspected cases are reported and confirmed; and in settings with particularly poor water and sanitation conditions.
Dogs are their own worst enemy when it comes to hot spots. The hot spots can arise surprisingly quickly; a few minutes of "work" can create an impressive area of self-inflicted trauma.
where [mathematical expression not reproducible] is the probability of the formation of a real hot spot between particles and drop weight surface, N is the total number of potential hot spots between particles and drop weight surface, and [[chi].sub.i] is the coefficient for ignition probability.
Two hot spots of Aphid and one hot spot of Thrips were reported from Layyah.
Table 4 provides data on Hot Spot use by individuals (i.e., not unique users) between March and November 2011 compared with the projected grant total of 5,040--based on the Free Library's 280-person monthly target.
They do so by asking difficult questions, creating a network of opportunities for unlimited cooperation, and championing the unique signature processes that create a context for the emergence of hot spots.
Any dog can get a hot spot, especially those with heavy coats who live in humid climates.
With these agreements, the Boingo global network includes more than 3,700 hot spots in nine Asian countries including China/Hong Kong SAR, India, Indonesia, Japan, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vietnam.
A detector for measuring infrared radiation (which is associated with heat) sensed a hot spot in the same polar area.